Reaper’s Bones 5 Kickstarter Has Record Breaking Launch!

Chris Palmer

   Just wanted to let everyone know that yesterday Reaper launched their Bones 5 Kickstarter with overwhelming success, reaching a record $1,000,000 in only about 7 hours!  The amount pledged is now passed 1,2000,000 and still going strong.  Also, they have reached the 10,000 backer milestone in the first day as well.

      The Kickstarter runs through November 2nd so there is still plenty of time to get on board with these excellent deals!  To find out more head on over to the Kickstarter page:  Bones 5

      Here is a current look at the Core Set; a great deal at $120, and sure to get even better with a whole month left to go!   There are also a lot of great Add-Ons that have been unlocked as well.
(Click to enlarge)

via All Bones About It http://allbonesabout.blogspot.com/2019/10/reapers-bones-5-kickstarter-has-record.html
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More Johnny Quest

Buck

Greg Priebe printed this spider from the episode Robot Spy.

Greg found the STL files for the Johnny Quest spider on Thingaverse (I think), and he printed one for me.  I think we’ll try to double the size of the next print, but I think it looks really cool.

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Townsfolk, Farmer: Bones 4 Figure

Chris Palmer

   This past week, because it was the weekend of our club’s regional gaming convention, BARRAGE, and I knew time would be scarce; I picked a relatively simple figure to paint, and did the Townsfolk Farmer from the Bones 4 Townsfolk Set.
      I prepped the figure in the usual way, soaking it in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish-soap added, then giving it a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying it.  I then glued the figure to a black-primed 1" fender washer with Aleene’s Tacky glue, and then placed the figure in my painting grip.

      I began by painting his face and hands with Americana “Mocha”.  I then did his tunic with Americana “Asphaltum”, and his pants with Vallejo “Brown Violet”

      Next, I painted his hood with Folk Art “Dapple Grey”, and his leggings with Ceramcoat “Territorial Beige”.  After that, I did his shoes (as well as the whole base) with Americana “Mississippi Mud”, the shaft of his hoe with Reaper MSP “Turkey Brown”, and the head of the hoe with Americana “Zinc”.

     I then painted his belt with Accent “Real Umber”, his buckle with Accent “Princely Pewter”, and the head of the hoe with Folk Art Metallics “Gunmetal Grey”.   After that, I let everything dry for a while, and then gave his face and hands a coat of Citadel “Reikland Fleshshade” wash.  When that was dry, I gave the rest of the figure a coat of Citadel “Agrax Earthsahde” wash".     When the washes were dry, I painted his eyes, and then highlighted his skin with Crafter’s Acrylic “Flesh”. 
    I then highlighted his hood with Folk Art “Grey Green”, his tunic with the “Territorial Beige”, and his pants with some of the base “Brown Violet” mixed with some Americana “Jade Green”.  After that, I highlighted his leggings with Americana “Khaki Tan”, and his shoes with Folk Art “Barn Wood”.    Lastly, I painted the entire base with “Americana "Mississippi Mud”.
      I let the figure dry overnight and the next day I gave it a coat of Americana “DuraClear Matte” varnish.    Then, when  the varnish was dry, I used some white glue to cover the base with a mix of dried coffee grounds and sand to look like fresh dirt.  Another overnight dry, and I sprayed the figure with Testor’s “Dullcote”.  

     A simple figure, but I’m happy with how he turned out.

via All Bones About It http://allbonesabout.blogspot.com/2019/09/townsfolk-farmer-bones-4-figure.html
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Rob Dean The Harford Area Weekly Kriegspielers (HAWKs) ran our annual game day/convention, Barrage,…

Rob Dean

The Harford Area Weekly Kriegspielers (HAWKs) ran our annual game day/convention, Barrage, this past weekend, 27 and 28 September.  This is the second year that we have extended Barrage to a second day, and the experiment seems to be working out.  Unofficially, it was looking like we had about 190 attendees, up about 30 over last year.  We wanted to make sure that there were enough games to keep everyone playing, so our event organizer encouraged us to offer something extra.  I signed up to run three games, two 54mm medieval skirmish games, and one 40mm Not Quite Seven Years War game.  My elder son, Norman, volunteered for two sessions of mass fantasy battles with his home rules using 1/72 scale plastic figures.

Norman’s fantasy game on Saturday

Since this is only the second year that we have had the extra day, I was unsurprised to find that attendance built a little slowly on Friday, so I cancelled my first medieval skirmish game and jumped in a guest GM’s modern microarmor game, with a NATO vs. Russians scenario.  (Norman ran his six-player game for two players about that time.) The tank scenario was a night action, so spotting was difficult and ranges short, giving it the flavor of a knife fight in a phone booth.  It was interesting, and not my usual cup of tea.  I was absorbed enough in the play that I forgot to take any pictures, but the GMs had pre-assembled the battlefield from hexagonal tiles in a traveling case, a very clever technique.

As the afternoon progressed, more attendees were arriving, so I was able to run the second scheduled session of my skirmish game with all six positions filled.  This was done using my home rules, “Medieval Mayhem”.  The whole project was originally built in 2003 for the HAWKs’ Battles for Beginners Contest, a showcase of things that one could do with a limited budget—one hundred 2003 dollars, equivalent to about $150 in 2019.  I ran games with it regularly for quite a while, but the figures hadn’t been on the table since Historicon in 2014.  I’ve added a few bits and pieces since then, and I have a few more left to do, so I’d like to get this back into the rotation for conventions.  The only difficulty in that is that the 54mm terrain is bulky, so I can’t really take it too far away unless I’m driving. I used my usual scenario for this game, involving a group of French soldiers attempting to prevent an English foraging party from returning to a besieged castle (which is off the table).   This was a bad day for the English; their longbowmen were generally ineffective, so only a single knight from the foragers made it off the table on the castle edge, which that player considered to be a personal victory, given the circumstances. I discussed the rules with Ross Macfarlane before the convention, and have edited a slightly updated 2019 version, which I’ll try to figure out how to post here.  Mostly, though, the rules are still the same as the prototype version we wrote on a napkin over dinner just before the convention in 2003.

Medieval Mayhem game in progress

After a night’s rest, I loaded up the car (with assistance from Norman) with all of the Not Quite Seven Years War figures we needed for the game.  The scenario was a riff on a game I fought with second son William a couple of months ago, in which a relief army (provided in this case by Schoeffen-Buschhagen and Wachovia representing the Pragmatic Coalition) needs to seize a set of three objectives defending by the besieging army (provided by the the forces of the Western League) in order to raise a siege.  We used A Gentleman’s War for the rules, setting it up with one of the recommended multi-player techniques—using one activation deck per pair of players. I was kept busy shuttling from one end of the table to the other refereeing, so I don’t have a good grasp of the overall action, but none of the three Coalition columns took their objectives.  After two and a half hours of play, the attackers were pretty thoroughly depleted, and we called it a resounding League victory.  I was unsurprised to find that one wing and the center ended up in an overlapping battle, and the players concluded that they needed to be on one activation deck.  They took care of that without my intervention, showing that they had a firm grasp on the rules by then.  Everyone seemed to be having a good time, but I feel like I could do a little better on the rules explanation.  The melee system is the fussiest part of a fairly simple set of rules, with three steps necessary (determination of advantage, melee, casualty recovery and results).  None of them are especially difficult, but it did seem to be the cause of most of the refereeing, so perhaps more practice on the explanation would help.

Norman finished his second fantasy mass battle game before I was done with the NQSYW, so he was able to help me clean up quickly.  We had some extra incentive to do that, because we were both signed up to play the next game on the table: Matt Kirkhart’s Bridge of Khazad-Dum.  Matt makes amazing miniatures from bits of wood and craft foam, and has been coming to Barrage since 2009 or so.  He started off doing ancients with these figures (styled “crafties”), but has brought fantasy lately.  Last year his dungeon crawl feature the idol from the cover of the AD&D 1st edition Player’s Handbook, and this year he went full Tolkien with two Moria scenarios, Balin’s Tomb and The Bridge of Khazad Dum.  Unfortunately I missed seeing the first.

In The Bridge, the nine chararacters of the Fellowship were played by five players, and Matt played the opposition, making it a co-op game.  I had Merry and Legolas.  The Fellowship simply had to cross a hall and the eponymous bridge, which looked easy enough until goblins started swarming everywhere.  Things looked grim as Gandalf was felled early on by a lucky hit by a goblin arrow, leaving us with nothing which would actually wound the Balrog, which presently showed up.  As can be seen from the pictures, he was an impressive bit of crafting, standing nearly a foot tall.  As we retreated step by step across the hall, cowed by the menace of the Balrog, we were lucky that the Balrog couldn’t roll a good die…we just ended up being pushed back, and, in fact, nobody was wounded.  Eventually, eight of the Fellowship made it out the door, just as in the book…so clearly they must have told Galadriel a tale with a few, um, embellishments, to give us the story that we have today.

After that, it was all over for me except for the clean-up.  One wind-down game of Roman chariot racing was going on as we broke down our tables, but everything was well in hand when I pulled out at 9:30 or so.  I needed to unload when I got home, but left things in piles until this morning. Running two different games with big figures and big terrain really tested my loadmaster skills with respect to my Toyota Yaris…Norman remarked that I should consider writing a sequel to our earlier book, Big Battles for Little Hands, which I should title Big Battles for Little Cars.

via The Sharp End of the Brush http://sharpbrush.blogspot.com/2019/09/the-harford-area-weekly-kriegspielers.html

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Saturday at the HAWKs BARRAGE Convention

Chris Palmer  This past weekend was the HAWK’s annual BARRAGE miniatures wargaming convention.  We had a good crowd for both days, and a great time was to be had! Here are some shots of a few of the games on Saturday.  For Fridays, photos, see here: Friday at BARRAGE.

 A Balin’s Tomb game.

Ancient Galleys.

Flames of War Tournament

Battle of Hoth

Norman Dean’s “The Plains of Peril”

A Gentleman’s War

The HAWKs celebrated their 25th Anniversary at the con!

A view of the hall Saturday night.

Mark Morn’s “What a Tanker!” game

The Bridge of Khazad-dum.  

via One More Gaming Project http://onemoregamingproject.blogspot.com/2019/09/saturday-at-hawks-barrage-convention.html
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Friday at the HAWKs BARRAGE Convention

Chris Palmer    This past weekend was the HAWK’s annual BARRAGE miniatures wargaming convention.  We had a good crowd for Friday, and a great time was to be had! Here are some shots of a few of the games on Friday.

Sam Fuson’s “Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Blue Carbuncle” game using GASLIGHT rules

A War of the Roses Skirmish I ran using Feudal Patrol rules.

John Thomasovich’s “Smolensk 1941: The Encirclement” game using modified KISS Rommel rules

Bill Slavicsek’s Star Wars RPG game using the Star Wars Role Playing Game rules

Rob Dean’s Medieval Mayhem game using homebrew rules.
Bill Molyneaux’s 55 Days at Peking game using homebrew rules.

Roxanne Patton’s Semper Adversor game using Combat Patrol rules

Mike Pierce’s Flank Encounter 1862 game using Sharp Practice rules.

via One More Gaming Project http://onemoregamingproject.blogspot.com/2019/09/friday-at-hawks-barrage-convention.html
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Combat Patrol(TM) at Southern Front

Buck

Les ran a Combat Patrol™ game last weekend at the Southern Front convention.  The tables looks great.  Les said it was the first time he’d run the game at a convention, and that it went very well.  Many of the folks in the pictures have played in my Combat Patrol™ games in the past, so apparently they weren’t too traumatized.  

🙂

Les gave me permission to post these pictures.

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Johnny Quest

Buck

I finished these this evening.

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Stone Giant Guard: Bones 4 Lost Valley Figure

Chris Palmer

     This past week I painted the Stone Giant Guard from the Bones 4 Lost Valley Expansion.  I had painted a Stone Giant before when I did the one that came with Bones 2 Expansion Set 1, and since I liked how that one had turned out,  I figured I’d just copy how I had done that one to some extent.
       I prepped the figure in the usual way, soaking it in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish-soap added, then giving it a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying it.   Then, after trimming the figure’s integral base a little, I glued the figure to a black-primed 2" fender washer with Aleene’s Tacky glue, and then used some blue-tac to stick it to the top of a pill bottle.

      I began by painting his skin, mixing equal part Crafters Acrylic “Storm Cloud Grey” and Folk Art “Milkshake”.  I then painted his fur loin cloth with Americana “Charcoal Grey” and his apron with Apple Barrel “Burnt Sienna"  I then painted his club with Americana "Light Cinnamon”.

     Next, I painted his belts and straps with Citadel “Snakebite Leather”, and the wraps around his club with Accent “Real Umber”.   After that, I painted the buckles, chisels, and other metal bits with Americana “Zinc”, and I painted the cord around his neck with Ceramcoat “Territorial Beige”.

     I then painted the rectangles on his apron with Americana “Charcoal”, and the ones hanging at his belt with Citadel “The Fang”.  I also used “The Fang” to paint the knobs on the club, and I painted the crystals on his necklace with Americana “Margarita”. After that, I worked on the rock he was holding, as well as the rocks on the base, painting them with Americana “Neutral Grey” and then splotching it with some Folk Art “Dapple Grey”, and some of the “Charcoal”.  I let everything dry for a while and then gave the entire figure a coat of Citadel “Nuln Oil” wash.

     When the wash was dry, I painted the eyes, and then highlighted the skin with some of the “Milkshake” mixed with the lighter Duncan “Slate Grey”. I then highlighted the apron with some Americana “Shading Flesh”, and the rectangles at the bottom of the apron with the “Zinc”, and those at the top of the apron with Ceramcoat “Denim”, and a little Folk Art “Cloudy Day”.

     Next, I highlighted his belts and straps with Ceramcoat “Maple Sugar Tan”, and the wraps on the club with Nicole’s Brown.  I then highlighted the club with Americana “Sable Brown”, and the stones in the club with Folk Art “Cloudy Day”.  After that,  I drybrushed the throwing rock and the stones in the ground, with some Americana “Dove Grey”.  I then painted the hammer head, buckles, and studs in the apron with Folk Art Metallics “Gunmetal Grey”, and lastly, I painted the base around the rocks with “Americana "Mississippi Mud”.
      I let the figure dry overnight and the next day I gave it a coat of Americana “DuraClear Matte” varnish.    Then, when  the varnish was dry, I used some white glue to flock the base around the stones.  Another overnight dry, and I sprayed it with Testor’s “Dullcote”.   When the “Dullcote” was dry, I went back and painted the crytal necklace with Tamiya “Clear Green”.

     I’m really pleased with how this big guy turned out.  I’m looking forward to tackling the Stone Giant Champion now.

via All Bones About It http://allbonesabout.blogspot.com/2019/09/stone-giant-guard-bones-4-lost-valley.html
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