Combat Patrol(TM) in the Philippines

Buck

The overall position from the American perspective

The overall situation at the start of the game from the American perspective

Last night at our club we played a Combat Patrol™ game featuring Americans fighting Moros in the Philippines.  The Americans had to get a mule train full of supplies across the table, but the Moros were trying to intercept the supplies.  We used the under-development Pacific supplement to represent Moro morale.

The American mule train

The American mule train

Moros advancing through cultivated fields to get their hands on the supplies

Moros advancing through cultivated fields to get their hands on the supplies

The Americans chose to go “up the middle” rather than either hanging back to create a defensive perimeter or going either right or left to attempt to avoid some of the Moros.

Moros advancing toward the rocky outcropping

Moros advancing toward the rocky outcropping

The Americans were caught in the middle of the table.  Because of this, and the constricted terrain, the Americans were unable to take advantage of their firepower.  The Moros were able to close.  Their melee attribute was very high, so once they closed into hand-to-hand, the Moros won the majority of the firefights.

The scrum begins to develop in the center of the table

The scrum begins to develop in the center of the table

An American team fired a shot into the rocky outcropping in which the overall Moro leader had taken position.  The Americans got a hit, and an incapacitation result, despite the cover provided by the rocks.  In Combat Patrol™, once you hit a target (by drawing a card and consulting the hit indicator section), you then draw a second card to determine which figure is hit, how severely, and whether cover protected the figure.  The card drawn had no cover icons, so the Moro leader was incapacitated.

Americans trying to establish a defensive perimeter as they are beset from all sides

Americans trying to establish a defensive perimeter as they are beset from all sides

With the overall leader gone, all of the subordinate Moro units were pinned.  The Activation Deck has black and red cards in it.  When a unit is pinned, it can only activate on the black cards.  This severely limited the Moros for a couple of turns, during which the Americans were able to regroup and establish a perimeter.  During this time, the Americans also had some good card draws in hand-to-hand combat.  The Americans, who began the game outnumbered two-to-one, were beginning to redress a lopsided loss exchange ratio, but not in time.  The Moros had seized the mule train and were well on their way off the table with it when we called the game a Moro victory.

Chaos in the Philippines

Chaos in the Philippines

We used the draft Japanese Morale from the under-develoment supplement to reflect the fanatical nature of the Moros.  I also gave them a Melee attribute of four, compared to the Americans’ one.  The Moros, however, had few rifles and had to depend on closing into hand-to-hand combat to carry the day.

Bill's platoon leader in the thick of the action

Bill’s platoon leader in the thick of the action

All in all, I think the rules worked quite well for this period.  I think it felt about right for the Philippines.  Look for a Moro supplement in the foreseeable future.

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One thought on “Combat Patrol(TM) in the Philippines

  1. Pretty cool – you used the bolt action rifles factories for the Americans? M1911’s?

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