Monthly Archives: September 2016

HAWKs Game Day 9.17.16

Chris Palmer    A bunch of the HAWKs got together on Saturday to play in a couple games with the goal of testing out some new rules for some under-development rule writing projects.
   The first was a WWII game using “Look, Sarge, No Charts: WWII” rules GM’d by Buck Surdu.  Even though this was a WWII game, the goal of playing it was to test out the concept of a cyber-phase for each turn, to be used in the upcoming “Look Sarge, No Charts; Sci-Fi/Near Future rulebook.
 

  I was in command of a battalion of French infantry tasked with taking a town and nearby bridge from a German force occupying it.   The game turned out to be a real nail-biter with the battle going down to the final turns.   In the end, when we had to stop due to the time, the Germans still barely held both objectives, but it would just have been a matter of a few turns more before we captured both targets.
   More importantly, we got a chance to see the cyber phase in action; and I think it worked really well.  While the first few turns were a relative stalemate cyber-wise, the French had some success late in the game in penetrating the German’s computer network, causing some real headaches which prevented the Germans from getting reinforcements to the town.

     The second game was a War of 1812 scenario designed to test the new artillery rules for the upcoming Napoleonic supplement to "Combat Patrol”, GM’d by Duncan Adams.  This game featured a small British held coastal town that was being raided by a force of Americans intent on gathering supplies for the approaching winter.

   Overlooking the water was a 6-pounder cannon, which could be swung around to shoot inland as well.  I was put in command of the gun and a small garrison force for the redoubt where the gun was located.  Part of the American objectives were to put the gun out of action so they could move some small boats up the waterway to haul off any supplies they liberated.
    At skirmish level, where canister range is almost the entire table, cannons are tricky things to incorporate.   Luckily the Americana’s had lots of cover to hide behind.  I was able to get one shot off at a unit in the open, moving between patches of cover, with devastating results. A second shot went high, and a third shot did some hurt on a unit in a patch of woods.

    In the end I still had control of the cannon, but other sections of our perimeter had been badly chewed up, and the Americans were able to loot a large amount of supplies.  However, we still controlled the water, so they would have to haul their loot away the hard way by hand.
   There was a third game after this, which was Star Wars using modified “Combat Patrol”; but unfortunately I had to leave at this point.  It was really fun day and the rules tests were deemed a success.

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First Run of Cyber Phase of LSNC: Science Fiction

Buck

Yesterday, I had a bunch of HAWKs to my war room to play three games.  I set up the gaming day because a West Point buddy, Ma’k Morin was coming for the weekend to visit Dave Wood.  One of the games I ran was an initial test of the cyber phase of the Look, Sarge, No Charts: Science Fiction rules that we are beginning to pull together.  The idea is that between turns, the two sides’ cyber forces fight for control of each others networks by allocating their cyber teams to attack or defend.  Based on the outcome of the cyber phase, the sides draw cards that provide cyber effects that can be applied during the turn.  Examples are the ability to “pin” an enemy unit, get an extra activation for a friendly unit, interrupt an enemy artillery mission, etc.

I have many of my science fiction figures painted and based; however, I haven’t put much thought into the unit attributes, so those forces aren’t ready to game yet.  Instead, I put a bunch of France 1940 figures on the table but added the cyber phase.  Again, the purpose was for this to be an initial test of the cyber phase.

So, how did it go?  Actually very well for a first attempt, I think.  The cyber effects were meaningful and interesting, but they did not overwhelm the game.  In this first play test, Kurt’s company of panzer grenadiers got to the bridge (pictured above), which was their objective.  Then Chris drew some really good and timely cyber effects that first pinned the armored battalion (to which the panzer grenadiers belonged) and then in the next turn, took an activation away from the panzer grenadier company.  This delayed the German advance for two, critical turns.

The cyber fight went okay.  While there is the potential for wild swings in the status of the penetration of enemy networks, in this first play test, the outcomes were very evenly matched, so there was little progress along the “cyber penetration” track.  Only in the last turn did Chris get a strong result that propelled him to a portion of the track where he could get two cyber cards per turn.  I am going to make one or two small adjustments, but nothing major until I get a couple more tests of the current ideas.

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Star Wars with Combat Patrol

Buck

Greg the GM surveys his dominion

Greg the GM surveys his dominion

Yesterday we tested Greg’s scenario and rules modifications to use Combat Patrol™ for Star Wars.  It’s probably not surprising that the rules worked well for Star Wars, as the film franchise is light on science and heavy on action.

Rebels preparing their forces

Rebels preparing their forces

Greg built the cards for the various units.  For the Rebel speeder sleds, we just used the record cards for SdKfz 251 halftracks.  For the “chicken walkers,” or AT-ST, we just used the stats for the US M-5 Stuart light tank.  Greg, who is much more in tune with the Star Wars lore than I am, said that these are lightly armored and easily knocked out.

Rebel APCs moving toward the objective

Rebel APCs moving toward the objective

The Rebels started in one corner of the board.  Their objective was to get the droid (shown in the APC in the picture, above) to the opposite corner of the table and off the board.  The Imperial objective was to stop that from happening.

Stormtroopers moving into position in the town

Stormtroopers moving into position in the town

The terrain consisted of a desert town that occupied about a third of the board.  Since the towns on the desert worlds of Star Wars look Middle Eastern, I used my Crescent Root Middle Eastern buildings.  Before he runs this scenario at a convention, Greg is going to build up some bits to give it a little more of a science fiction look, but in general, I think the Star Wars figures looked pretty good next the Middle Eastern terrain.

A "chicken walker" blocks the path of the Rebels

A “chicken walker” blocks the path of the Rebels

While the Rebels had to get from one corner to the opposite corner, the Imperial forces started equally divided between the other two corners.  From each corner the Imperial forces had an AT-ST.  These were placed in the scenario to give the Stormtroopers a chance to cut off the Rebel escape.

Geoff's AT-ST gets knocked out by a rebel "projectile launcher"

Geoff’s AT-ST gets knocked out by a rebel “projectile launcher”

You can see Geoff’s reaction tot he loss of his AT-ST in this video:  IMG_0091.MOV

Rebels hide behind a wall preparing for an assault on the Stormtroopers

Rebels hide behind a wall preparing for an assault on the Stormtroopers

Kurt’s APC is knocked out by small arms fire from Eric’s Stormtroopers.

Rebels take incoming HE fire from the Stormtroopers

Rebels take incoming HE fire from the Stormtroopers

Eric launches some HE at Bill’s rebels.

Rebels caught in a deadly Imperial crossfire

Rebels caught in a deadly Imperial crossfire

I had a team of Rebel infantry that was moving into the town to distract the Stormtroopers and keep them from interdicting the path of the APC with the droid.  I got pretty aggressive, and Eric hit me with two teams and a bag full of grenades.   It didn’t go well for my Rebels, but it did stop these two Imperial teams from repositioning to fire on my APC.

Stormtroopers taking up blocking positions

Stormtroopers taking up blocking positions

In the end, despite a lot of fire from Geoff’s infantry, I managed get close to the opposite corner with the droid.  Eric or Geoff hit the driver with small arms fire, which caused the vehicle to lose an activation of movement.  I dismounted the infantry and fired on Geoff’s Stormtroopers while continuing to flee with the APC.  I was eventually able to drive off the table, so we Rebels won the game.

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Ezren, Iconic Wizard: Figure 245 of 266

Chris Palmer

   This week I painted up Ezren, Icon Wizard, from the Iconics II Pathfinder Miniatures set.   Like Monday’s figure, which I decided to turn into a Fire-themed Elementalist, this one I felt would serve as a good Elementalist too, but an Air-themed one.  He just had a very wind blown look about him, and I thought I could accent that by painting some wind designs on his clothing.
 I prepped the figure in the usual way; soaking it in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish- soap added, then giving it a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying it.  I then glued the figure to a white-primed 1" fender washer with Aleene’s Tacky glue, and then glued the washer-mounted figure to a tongue depressor with a couple drops of the Elmer’s glue.

I began by giving the entire figure a wash with Reaper MSP “Blue Liner” using a wet brush.  When the Liner was dry, I painted his face and hands with Folk Art “Dark Brown”.  I then painted his long sleeve under shirt with Crafter’s Acrylic “Cool Blue”, and then the short sleeve under shirt with Crafter’s Acrylic “Navy Blue”. Next, I painted the top tunic with Folk Art Cloudy Day".

     I then painted his boots, wrist guards, and crossbow bolt pouch with Americana “Zinc”.  Next, I painted his leather armor pieces with Americana “Wedgewood Blue”, and then the border of his tunic with Americana “True Blue”. I followed that by painting his hair with Americana “Dove Grey”.

     Next, I painted his staff with Folk Art “Barn Wood”; and then did the tubular case on his left, and the small pouch on his right with Crafter’s Acrylic “Storm Cloud Grey”.  I also painted the cross bow with Americana “Asphaltum”, and the bolts and the crossbow string with Americana “Khaki Tan”.   I painted some of the dangles from his belt with Folk Art “Metallic Blue Sapphire”, and the then went back and repainted the sleeves of the long sleeve under shirt with Folk Art Pearl “Aqua Moire”. I also overpainted the border of the tunic with Folk Art Extreme Glitter “Hologram”.
     After everything had a while to dry, I gave the entire figure a wash with Citadel “Nuln Oil” wash using a wet brush".  When the wash was dry, I painted his eyes, and then highlighted his skin with a mix of the “Dark Brown”, and Crafter’s Acrylic “Flesh”.

   I then highlighted the hair with White and then moved to highlighting his long sleeved shirt with the base “Aqua Moire”, and the short sleeve shirt with the “True Blue”.  Next, I highlighted his tunic with some of the base “Cloudy Day” mixed with some White.  After that, I used the White to paint various spiral wind symbols on his tunic.   I then highlighted his staff by drybrushing it with the base “Barn Wood”.

Next, I painted all the belts and unpainted pouches with Black, and when dry, I highlighted them with Ctadel “The Fang”.   After that, I highlighted his leather armor with some of the base W’edgewood Blue" mixed with a bit of the “Cool Blue”, and then highlighted his boots, bolt pouch, and wrist guards with some of the “Storm Cloud Grey”.  I highlighted the tube thing, and the the large pouch with some of the “Dove Grey”, and the crossbow bolts with the base “Khaki Tan”.  Next, I highlighted the sleeve and bottom borders of his tunic with some of the base “True Blue” mixed with some of the “Cool Blue”.  When that was dry, I went back over it with some of the “Hologram” glitter paint.  I then painted the ends of the tube thing, the fittings on the crossbow, and the beer stein-looking object at his side with Ceramcoat “Metallic Pewter”, and then highlighted these parts with Folk Art “Silver Sterling”.   Lastly, I painted the figure’s integral base with White.
    When everything had overnight to dry, I glued a couple pieces of light blue sea glass to his base.  After the glue dried, I drybrushed the glass lightly with White, and then gave the figure a coat of Ceramcoat “Matte Varnish”.  The next day, I flocked the base with Woodland Scenics “Snow” flock and the next day I sprayed the figure with Testor’s Dullcote.   When the Dullcote was dry, I went back and repainted the sea glass with Americana “DuraClear Gloss”.

     I’m really happy how he turned out.  My hope was that he would read as “Air”, and not as “Water”. It was a risk with using so much blue; however I think it comes across as “Air” enough, so I’m satisfied.    Here are the two Elementalist together: Fire and Air.

Figure 245 of 266: Complete

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Gun Mount on Sarissa Armored Train

Buck

In my previous post about a recent Poland 1939 Combat Patrol ™ game, I showed some pictures of the Sarissa armored train MDF and paper kit.  In a couple of the pictures you can see an empty area that was obviously meant for some sort of weapon.  I thought that it would be a good place for an artillery observer or machine-gun crew.  Duncan found this picture on the Warlord Web site:

Carissa armored artillery carriage with quad anti-aircraft gun

Carissa armored artillery carriage with quad anti-aircraft gun

While the train is obviously meant to be German, based on the shape of the turret provided for one of the other cars, I wanted it for a Polish armored train.  I did some looking for Polish WWII anti-aircraft guns and found these pictures.

Polish 40mm Bofors anti-aircfaft gun

Polish 40mm Bofors anti-aircfaft gun

This is a technique for anti-aircraft fire if you have no purpose-built anti-aircraft weapons.  We were still taught this technique in the 1980s.  I don't know if there is a documented case of this ever working.

This is a technique for anti-aircraft fire if you have no purpose-built anti-aircraft weapons. We were still taught this technique in the 1980s. I don’t know if there is a documented case of this ever working.

I figured it shouldn’t be too hard to find a 40mm Bofors anti-tank gun in scale for 28mm figures.  Voila!  Warlord had one in their Bolt Action line.

I figure that I could file the edges of the helmets down and make this a passable Polish crew.  I have not seen the kit in person, but for every kit like this I have ever seen the carriage and the gun mount are separate.  I can use this as a ground-mounted gun in some scenarios and then put the gun in the train for other scenarios.  Unfortunately I just put in an order for Polish tankettes and the Wz-34 armored cars, so I won’t be ordering from Warlord any time soon, but it will go on my “next time I order” list.

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Poland 1939 with Combat Patrol

Buck

At Historicon this Summer I had a chance to pick up the Sarissa armored train for 28mm figures.  Though it is meant to be a German train, I think, it works pretty well as a Polish train.  In these pictures you can see that I have sprayed it in field yellow and have not air brushed the brown and green camouflage pattern.  (I got out the airbrush and found out is was broken.)   Last Friday I put the scenario I plan to run at Fall In (in November) on the table at club night.

In the scenario, a Polish train has parked on a road that the Germans need.  The leading German forces have been tasked to capture the train so that it can be moved.  The Polish platoon is trying to defeat as many Germans as possible.  The idea is that a major German offensive is coming down this road, and it is imperative to get the train out of the way.  The rear car of the train has a gun that has run out of ammunition, so the train’s only armament is a 37mm gun in the forward turret.  The Germans entered the table along the top edge of the photo.  They had two half tracks and a truck full of infantry.  They had three more infantry squads and two Pz 38(t) light tanks.  The Poles had a light anti-tank gun and an anti-tank rifle.

Note that the Germans did not have to destroy all the Poles.  They merely needed to capture the train.  Most gamers will stop and fight, regardless of the mission, but this group had seasoned HAWKs who focused on the objective of capturing the train.  I defined capturing the train as having three infantrymen in the cab.

The Poles deployed no infantry in or around the train, deciding to defend well forward.  The Germans wisely avoided the obvious killing ground in the center of the table and attacked along both flanks.  The Germans did not know that only one of the two train turrets was operational, so they moved cautiously to stay out of its lines of sight.  The shack in the center of the table was unoccupied, and the Poles didn’t really have an opportunity to occupy it.  The shack did serve to limit the Poles’ lines of sight and enable the German infantry to move forward from the corn field.

The Poles had a strong infantry defensive position in the center, but the Germans avoided the area.  On the Polish left, the green German squads in the halftracks and truck moved up through the woods.  The Poles had place a small force on the small hill just off to the right of the picture above.  Their purpose was to slow down the German advance.  They did so, but at extreme cost.  They even tried to toss a satchel charge into the midst of the advancing Germans but it didn’t land were intended and did no damage.  As we called the game the Germans were swarming over the hill and advancing toward the front of the train.

Unfortunately I didn’t get any shots of the German armor advancing on the Polish right flank.  They kept well out of line of sight of the anti-tank gun.  The ATR got off a shot, but missed.  The right flank Polish squad had been all but wiped out by the combined fire of several German squads and tank fire.  At the end we called the game a German victory, because it was obvious that they were going to get to the train.

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Seltyiel, Iconic Magus: Figure 244 of 266

Chris Palmer

  Over the weekend I finished up the first of the Iconics II Pathfinder Miniatures set: Seltyiel, Iconic Magus.  I’ve slowly been trying to create a Wizard and Apprentice pair for each of the 10 schools of magic from the Frostgrave core rulebook, and one of the ones I haven’t done yet is the Elementalist type.   I thought this guy might make a good fire-based Elementalist, so decided to go that direction with my painting.
         I prepped the figure in the usual way; soaking it in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish- soap added, then giving it a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying it.  I then glued the figure to a white-primed 1" fender washer with Aleene’s Tacky glue, and then glued the washer-mounted figure to a tongue depressor with a couple drops of the Elmer’s glue.
    I began by giving the entire figure a wash with Reaper MSP “Brown Liner” using a wet brush.

   When the Liner wash was dry, I began painting by doing his skin with Crafter’s Acrylic “Flesh”.   Next, I painted his coat with Americana “Asphaltum”, and then painted the lining with Crafter’s Acrylic “Orange Spice”.

     I then painted his waist hanging with Apple Barrel “Yellow”, and then ll his armor bits with Citadel “Snakebite Leather”.  Next, I painted his sash with Ceramcoat “Opaque Red”; and then did his dagger scabbard, side scabbard, pouch, and bottle holder all with Apple Barrel “Burnt Sienna”.  I then painted the scabbard around back with Ceramcoat “Black Cherry”, and his boots and weapon grips with Ceramcoat “Walnut”.

     Next, I painted his hair with Apple Barrel “Apple Maple Syrup”, and then painted the bottle at his waist with Crafter’s Acrylic “Purple Passion”.  I then painted all the little studs and buckles, the hilt of the sword, and the fittings on the scabbards, all with Accent “Mustard Seed”.  I then went back and repainted all these with Ceramcoat “Bronze”.

     After everything had a while to dry, I gave the entire figure a wash with Citadel “Agrax Earthshade” wash using a wet brush.  When the wash was dry, I painted his eyes; and then highlighted his skin with the base “Flesh”, and then mixed in a little Crafter’s Acrylic “Light Antique White” to do lighter highlights.    I then highlighted his hair with Americana “Buttermilk”, and then used a little of the “Light Antique White”.  After that, I highlighted his coat with a mix of Folk Art “Barn Wood” and the original “Asphaltum”.

     Next, I highlighted the coat’s lining with a mix of the base Orange Spice", and some Crafter;s Acrylic “Pure Pumpkin”.  I then highlighted all the leather armor using a mix of the base “Snakebite Leather”, and some of the Apple Maple Syrup" I had used on the hair.  I highlighted the sash with Americana “Cadmium Red”, and the waist hanging with Crafter’s Acrylic “Daffodil Yellow”. Then I highlighted the little bottle with a mix of the base “purple Passion”, and some Apple Barrel “Apple Lavender”.    Next, I began work on the flaming bird spell effect in his hand by painting his hand and the bottom of the bird with Apple Barrel “Lemon Chiffon”.  I tried to feather it down his forearm a little.

     Next, I used some of the “Daffodil Yellow” working out from the “Lemon Chiffon”, both up the body of the bird, and along the edges of the “Lemon Chiffon” on his forearm. After that I used some of the “Yellow”, working up the body of the bird and out across the underside of his wings; and then Americana “Tangerine”, and then the “Orange Spice”.  I followed this with some of the “Cadmium Red”, and lastly along the tips of the wings and tops of the birds horns, some Ceramcoat “Black Cherry”.  I then went back and added highlights to his fingers with plain “White”.
      I then painted his sword blade with Americana “Zinc”.  After that I went back and added highlights to the parts I had painted with the “Bronze”, using Ceramcoat “14K Gold”. And I followed up that by painting the sword blade with Folk Art Metallics “Gunmetal Grey”.  I then highlighted the blade with Folk Art “Silver Sterling”.   Lastly, I painted the figure’s integral base with White.
    When everything had overnight to dry, I gave the figure a coat of Ceramcoat “Matte Varnish” early the next morning.  Midday, I flocked the white areas with Woodland Scenics “Snow” flock and the next day I sprayed the figure with Testor’s Dullcote.

     I’m pleased with how he turned out, especially the flaming bird spell effect.

Figure 244 of 266: Complete

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Damien, Hellborn Wizard: Figure 243 of 266

Chris Palmer

     This week I also painted Damien, Hellborn Wizard from the Dark Heroes set, which completes that set.  It now joins the list of completed sets over on the right.
     I prepped the figure in the usual way; soaking it in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish- soap added, then giving it a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying it.  I then glued the figure to a black-primed 1" fender washer with Aleene’s Tacky glue, and then glued the washer-mounted figure to a tongue depressor with a couple drops of the Elmer’s glue.

       I began by giving the figure a wash with Reaper “Blue Liner” using a wet brush.  This was to help bring out the details so I could see them better.   When that was dry, I painted all his skin with Crafter’s Acrylic “African Violet”.  Next, I painted his pants with Crafter’s Acrylic Cinnamon Brown, and then painted his coat with Ceramcoat “Opaque Red”.

     Next, I painted his boots, coat interior, shoulders, and lapels, hair, belts and pouches, and what appear to be shirt cuffs? all with Black.  I then painted his staff with Folk Art “Gray Green”, and the rock on top with Ceramcoat “Black Cherry”.   After that, I painted his coat cuff strips, necklaces, buttons, and buckles all with Accent “Mustard Seed”.  I then painted his horns with Folk Art “Cloudy Day”.

        I went back and repainted his coat cuff stripes, necklaces, buttons, and buckles all with Ceramcoat “Bronze”.  After that had a while to dry, I gave the entire figure a wash with Citadel “Nuln Oil” wash using a wet brush.   When the wash was dry, I painted his eyes, using the “Black Cherry” for the pupils, and then highlighted his skin with a mix of the African Violet and Apple Barrel “Apple Lavender”.  

     Next, I highlighted his coat with the base “Opaque Red”, and then highlighted his pants with Crafter’s Edition “Spice Brown”.  I drybrushed his boots, coat lapels, and shoulder pads, all with Americana “Zinc”, and then highlighted his hair with Citadel “The Fang”.  I then highlighted his staff by drybrushing it with the base “Gray Green”, and then highlighted the rock with some Americana “Cranberry Wine”.  I then highlighted his horns with some of the base “Cloudy Day” mixed with a little Crafter’s Acrylic “Light Antique White”.   After that I highlighted his coat cuff stripes, necklaces, buttons, and buckles all with Ceramcoat “14K Gold”.  Lastly, I painted his base with Ceramcoat “Walnut”.
     I let the figure dry over night and the next day I gave it a coat of Ceramcoat “Matte Varnish” and, when dry, flocked the base.  Another overnight dry, and I sprayed it with Testor’s Dullcote".

I’m happy with how the figure turned out.  I tried going with some bold color choices and in the end I think they worked.
     Next up I’ll be starting the Iconics II Pathfinder Miniatures set.

Figure 243 of 266: Complete

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Labor Day Labors

Buck

A squad of "Space Roomans"

A squad of “Space Roomans”

See Ma’k Morin’s blog post about Roomans here.

Yesterday I painted 13 that Ma’k converted to “space Roomans” by combining parts of a Ral Partha Rooman with the body of a Reaper science fiction figure.  I think the conversion was quite effective.

One fire team of "Space Roomans"

One fire team of “Space Roomans”

I cut some of the arms and re-glued them to give a little more variety to the posing.  It was a primitive conversion job, but from wargaming distance, they look okay.

The other fire team of "Space Roomans"

The other fire team of “Space Roomans”

Beware space farers when you hear the fear-inspiring battle cry of the Romman marines:  ”Roop! Roop! Adoop!”

The back of the squad leader

The back of the squad leader

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Darkrasp, Evil Priest: Figure 242 of 266

Chris Palmer

  Some of you may remember that last December I converted an extra Darkrasp Evil Priest figure, that I had traded for back in 2013, into a Santa Claus figure.  Well, this week I finally got around to painting the original Darkrasp, Evil Priest, figure that came in the Dark Heroes set from my original Kickstarter pledge; and once again I did a conversion. 🙂
    A bit of train of thought now…  As I looked at this figure and pondered how to paint it, I considered how most of the painted examples of this figure that I have seen have been done up in dark colors: black, grey, brown; and I decided that I wanted to do something different, so I thought about light colors. Immediately I thought, “How about white?”. As I considered white, I thought that with his flowing robes white would make him look almost like an angel; which led me to think that, well, if he was an angel then he’d be The Angel of Death, which would be kind of be a cool figure.  If I was going to sell the angel idea he would need wings though; and where would I get wings?  So I started pawing through my unpainted Bones collection, remembering that the Lesser Demons set had a bunch of winged figures in it. And, voila! I found what I thought would be the perfect set of wings there among the Lesser Demons: The Vulture Demon

      I was able to pry the wings off the figure, and I held them up against the Darkrasp figure to see how they looked.  I couldn’t believe what a perfect match they were!  Not only did they seem the perfect size, and were feather covered; but they also mirrored the symmetry of the figure with the left wing raised like the left arm, and the right wing extended to match the position of the scythe.  So, I used my Dremel with a small drill bit to cut a slot in Darkrasp’s back, and glued the wings in place with Gorilla Superglue.

     I began by painting his face and hands with Americana “Shading Flesh”.   I then painted his robes with Folk Art “Platinum Grey”, and his wings with Americana “Bleached Sand”.

      Next, I painted the scythe handle and the skull on the top with Americana “Khaki Tan”.  I then painted the scroll with Americana “Buttermilk”, after which I painted the scroll holder, chains, incense container, and scythe blade with Accent “Mustard Seed”.

      I repainted the parts I had painted “Mustard Seed”, this time using Ceramcoat “Bronze”.   Then, after everything had a while to dry, I gave the entire figure a wash with Citadel “Agrax Earthshade” wash using a wet brush.

      When the wash was dry, I drybrushed the wings using, first, Crafter’s Acrylic “Light Antique White”, and then plain White.  Next, I painted highlights on his robes, layering up from, first, the Platinum Grey", then Americana “Dove Grey”, and then plain White.

      I then highlighted the scroll using the base “Buttermilk”; and then highlighted the scythe handle and the skull on top using, first, Crafter’s Edition “Taupe”, and then the “Taupe” mixed with a little of the “Bleached Sand”.  I painted his beard Black after that.

     I highlighted the beard with Citadel “The Fang”,  and then used Americana “Zinc” to paint all the shadows under his robe where it was raised up along the bottom, as well as inside his raised left sleeve.   I painted his eyes, and then highlighted his face and hands with the base “Shading Flesh”.  I mixed in a little Crafter’s Acrylic “Flesh” to highlight the tip of his nose.  Next, I highlighted all the parts I had painted “Bronze”, using Ceramcoat “Wedding Gold”.  And, lastly, I painted the figure’s integral base using Ceramcoat “Walnut”.
      After the figure had overnight to dry, I gave it a coat of Ceramcoat “Matte Varnish”.   When the varnish was dry, I flocked the base, and the next day I sprayed the figure with Testor’s Dullcote.
 

     I really like how this conversion turned out.  I think he makes for a very formidable angel, and I think the all-white paint job looks really good on the figure.

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