Daily Archives: September 18, 2016

Ma’k Morin’s Fantasy Rules

Buck

To culminate gaming weekend to commemorate Ma’k Morin’s visit to the Aberdeen area, Mark ran a test of his fantasy rules at Wood’s Hole (Dave’s basement).  It involved “bad guys,” like Orcs, insect men, fire-spitting salamanders, goblins, and others, attempting to capture the tower from the “good” guys, composed of humans, dwarves, elves, and Roomans.

You can see a lot of cards around the table.  Each unit in Mark’s game has a card with all its attributes, characteristics, and special abilities.  Mark wasn’t sure how many players we would have, so he planned for eight.  With only four players, we had a lot of figures to control, and it was hard to find the right card.  When players have the right number of units, I think managing the cards would be easier.

Roomans in the defense

Roomans in the defense

In this picture you can see Mark’s Roomans (with reddish fur) and my Roomans (in green) preparing to defend a strong position against the bad guys.  Both Dave and Eric sent forces to attack this position.  I managed to fend off the succubus and the first fire-breathing salamander, but by the end of the game, Eric’s second salamander was approach and his Elite Death Guard Cavalry was about to get behind me.

Don's dwarves defending a series of cheveaux de fris

Don’s dwarves defending a series of cheveaux de fris

There are a few things that can be done to streamline and improve the rules, but it went pretty well as a first test.

My largely ineffective "automatic" ballista atop the tower we were defending

My largely ineffective “automatic” ballista atop the tower we were defending

We had been gaming since Friday evening, and we had to quit this game around 1400, so we didn’t fight the battle to a conclusion.  I think the outcome remained in doubt when we quit.    It was a fun game, and it was fun to see a lot of Mark’s troops on the table for the first time in 30 years.

from Buck’s Blog http://ift.tt/2ciZFrg
via IFTTT
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2cx5ddA
via IFTTT

Advertisements

War of 1812 with Combat Patrol

Buck

Long shot of the War of 1812 game

Long shot of the War of 1812 game

This weekend our club got together for a series of game in my war room.  The second game of the day was Duncan’s War of 1812 skirmish game using Combat Patrol™.  Duncan has been working on an adaptation of the Combat Patrol™: World War II for the Napoleonic era for some months.  A purpose of this play test was to work through Duncan’s artillery rules.  While we think that artillery doesn’t really have a place in a black powder skirmish game, since its effects are sort of “nuclear” in a game with just a handful of figures, several Combat Patrol™ players have asked for artillery rules.

This skirmish game involved several British units converging on an American supply dump in the upper Niagara area.  The British and Canadians had to gather supplies from the cabins and wagons while we Americans had to stop them.

American artillery position

American artillery position

Because we wanted to test the artillery rules, part of the Canadian objective was to capture this American gun emplacement.  The story was that the Canadians could bring a small ship to the dock to haul away supplies if the gun was silenced.  I was on the other end of the table, betting slapped around by Canadians, but I understand that the two shots of canister that were fired had a devastating effect.

The action begins to heat up

The action begins to heat up

A couple of my defenders facing off against the Canadians in the woods in the distance

A couple of my defenders facing off against the Canadians in the woods in the distance

One of the things that is different between this set of rules and the base WWII rules is that between shots, figures must spend an action to reload.  You can see some white pipe cleaners in the pictures.  Those were used to mark when a musket had been fired and needed to be reloaded.  In this picture you can also see a white rubber band around one figure (marking him as wounded) and a black rubber band (marking him as stunned).

There was a lot of fighting around this field.

With the small modifications that Duncan has made, Combat Patrol™ is working very well for the black powder era.  We have accounted for the differences between close order and open order units, cavalry, and now artillery.  This supplement is getting very close to being releasable.  Stay tuned.

from Buck’s Blog http://ift.tt/2cgPMFJ
via IFTTT
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2d4MBHa
via IFTTT

HAWKs Game Day 9.17.16

Chris Palmer    A bunch of the HAWKs got together on Saturday to play in a couple games with the goal of testing out some new rules for some under-development rule writing projects.
   The first was a WWII game using “Look, Sarge, No Charts: WWII” rules GM’d by Buck Surdu.  Even though this was a WWII game, the goal of playing it was to test out the concept of a cyber-phase for each turn, to be used in the upcoming “Look Sarge, No Charts; Sci-Fi/Near Future rulebook.
 

  I was in command of a battalion of French infantry tasked with taking a town and nearby bridge from a German force occupying it.   The game turned out to be a real nail-biter with the battle going down to the final turns.   In the end, when we had to stop due to the time, the Germans still barely held both objectives, but it would just have been a matter of a few turns more before we captured both targets.
   More importantly, we got a chance to see the cyber phase in action; and I think it worked really well.  While the first few turns were a relative stalemate cyber-wise, the French had some success late in the game in penetrating the German’s computer network, causing some real headaches which prevented the Germans from getting reinforcements to the town.

     The second game was a War of 1812 scenario designed to test the new artillery rules for the upcoming Napoleonic supplement to "Combat Patrol”, GM’d by Duncan Adams.  This game featured a small British held coastal town that was being raided by a force of Americans intent on gathering supplies for the approaching winter.

   Overlooking the water was a 6-pounder cannon, which could be swung around to shoot inland as well.  I was put in command of the gun and a small garrison force for the redoubt where the gun was located.  Part of the American objectives were to put the gun out of action so they could move some small boats up the waterway to haul off any supplies they liberated.
    At skirmish level, where canister range is almost the entire table, cannons are tricky things to incorporate.   Luckily the Americana’s had lots of cover to hide behind.  I was able to get one shot off at a unit in the open, moving between patches of cover, with devastating results. A second shot went high, and a third shot did some hurt on a unit in a patch of woods.

    In the end I still had control of the cannon, but other sections of our perimeter had been badly chewed up, and the Americans were able to loot a large amount of supplies.  However, we still controlled the water, so they would have to haul their loot away the hard way by hand.
   There was a third game after this, which was Star Wars using modified “Combat Patrol”; but unfortunately I had to leave at this point.  It was really fun day and the rules tests were deemed a success.

via One More Gaming Project http://ift.tt/2cK5XMh
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2czJSFJ
via IFTTT

First Run of Cyber Phase of LSNC: Science Fiction

Buck

Yesterday, I had a bunch of HAWKs to my war room to play three games.  I set up the gaming day because a West Point buddy, Ma’k Morin was coming for the weekend to visit Dave Wood.  One of the games I ran was an initial test of the cyber phase of the Look, Sarge, No Charts: Science Fiction rules that we are beginning to pull together.  The idea is that between turns, the two sides’ cyber forces fight for control of each others networks by allocating their cyber teams to attack or defend.  Based on the outcome of the cyber phase, the sides draw cards that provide cyber effects that can be applied during the turn.  Examples are the ability to “pin” an enemy unit, get an extra activation for a friendly unit, interrupt an enemy artillery mission, etc.

I have many of my science fiction figures painted and based; however, I haven’t put much thought into the unit attributes, so those forces aren’t ready to game yet.  Instead, I put a bunch of France 1940 figures on the table but added the cyber phase.  Again, the purpose was for this to be an initial test of the cyber phase.

So, how did it go?  Actually very well for a first attempt, I think.  The cyber effects were meaningful and interesting, but they did not overwhelm the game.  In this first play test, Kurt’s company of panzer grenadiers got to the bridge (pictured above), which was their objective.  Then Chris drew some really good and timely cyber effects that first pinned the armored battalion (to which the panzer grenadiers belonged) and then in the next turn, took an activation away from the panzer grenadier company.  This delayed the German advance for two, critical turns.

The cyber fight went okay.  While there is the potential for wild swings in the status of the penetration of enemy networks, in this first play test, the outcomes were very evenly matched, so there was little progress along the “cyber penetration” track.  Only in the last turn did Chris get a strong result that propelled him to a portion of the track where he could get two cyber cards per turn.  I am going to make one or two small adjustments, but nothing major until I get a couple more tests of the current ideas.

from Buck’s Blog http://ift.tt/2cH77LI
via IFTTT
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2czQqB6
via IFTTT

Star Wars with Combat Patrol

Buck

Greg the GM surveys his dominion

Greg the GM surveys his dominion

Yesterday we tested Greg’s scenario and rules modifications to use Combat Patrol™ for Star Wars.  It’s probably not surprising that the rules worked well for Star Wars, as the film franchise is light on science and heavy on action.

Rebels preparing their forces

Rebels preparing their forces

Greg built the cards for the various units.  For the Rebel speeder sleds, we just used the record cards for SdKfz 251 halftracks.  For the “chicken walkers,” or AT-ST, we just used the stats for the US M-5 Stuart light tank.  Greg, who is much more in tune with the Star Wars lore than I am, said that these are lightly armored and easily knocked out.

Rebel APCs moving toward the objective

Rebel APCs moving toward the objective

The Rebels started in one corner of the board.  Their objective was to get the droid (shown in the APC in the picture, above) to the opposite corner of the table and off the board.  The Imperial objective was to stop that from happening.

Stormtroopers moving into position in the town

Stormtroopers moving into position in the town

The terrain consisted of a desert town that occupied about a third of the board.  Since the towns on the desert worlds of Star Wars look Middle Eastern, I used my Crescent Root Middle Eastern buildings.  Before he runs this scenario at a convention, Greg is going to build up some bits to give it a little more of a science fiction look, but in general, I think the Star Wars figures looked pretty good next the Middle Eastern terrain.

A "chicken walker" blocks the path of the Rebels

A “chicken walker” blocks the path of the Rebels

While the Rebels had to get from one corner to the opposite corner, the Imperial forces started equally divided between the other two corners.  From each corner the Imperial forces had an AT-ST.  These were placed in the scenario to give the Stormtroopers a chance to cut off the Rebel escape.

Geoff's AT-ST gets knocked out by a rebel "projectile launcher"

Geoff’s AT-ST gets knocked out by a rebel “projectile launcher”

You can see Geoff’s reaction tot he loss of his AT-ST in this video:  IMG_0091.MOV

Rebels hide behind a wall preparing for an assault on the Stormtroopers

Rebels hide behind a wall preparing for an assault on the Stormtroopers

Kurt’s APC is knocked out by small arms fire from Eric’s Stormtroopers.

Rebels take incoming HE fire from the Stormtroopers

Rebels take incoming HE fire from the Stormtroopers

Eric launches some HE at Bill’s rebels.

Rebels caught in a deadly Imperial crossfire

Rebels caught in a deadly Imperial crossfire

I had a team of Rebel infantry that was moving into the town to distract the Stormtroopers and keep them from interdicting the path of the APC with the droid.  I got pretty aggressive, and Eric hit me with two teams and a bag full of grenades.   It didn’t go well for my Rebels, but it did stop these two Imperial teams from repositioning to fire on my APC.

Stormtroopers taking up blocking positions

Stormtroopers taking up blocking positions

In the end, despite a lot of fire from Geoff’s infantry, I managed get close to the opposite corner with the droid.  Eric or Geoff hit the driver with small arms fire, which caused the vehicle to lose an activation of movement.  I dismounted the infantry and fired on Geoff’s Stormtroopers while continuing to flee with the APC.  I was eventually able to drive off the table, so we Rebels won the game.

from Buck’s Blog http://ift.tt/2cTuZdS
via IFTTT
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2cV39Rx
via IFTTT

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: