Daily Archives: July 28, 2016

Mystic Theurge: Bones II Figure

Chris Palmer

     This week I painted up the Mystic Theurge figure from the Bones II Pathfinder Heroes Set.  My plan is to use him as a Soothsayer type wizard’s apprentice for Frostgrave.
    I prepped the figure in the usual way; soaking it in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish- soap added, then giving it a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying it.  I then glued the figure to a white-primed 1" fender washer with Aleene’s Tacky glue, and then glued the washer-mounted figure to a tongue depressor with a couple drops of the Elmer’s glue.

     Since I joined the Reaper Forums about a year ago, I found I was reading a lot of high praise for the Reaper brand of Liners, which are a kind of mix between and ink and wash. From what I read, they are reported to be great as a kind of “primer” coat of Bones as they really show off the details as well as shade the figure.  So, I finally broke down recently and ordered a triad of the Brown, Grey, and Blue.  I thought I would take this opportunity to try out the “Grey” Liner, so I gave the entire figure a wash with it using a wet brush.  I then painted the hands and head with GW “Vermin Brown”.

 Next, I painted the under robes with Apple Barrel “Apple Scotch Blue”, and the outer jacket with Crafter’s Acrylic “Purple Passion”.

      I then painted the belts around his waist with Crafter’s Acrylic “Navy Blue”.  I also used the “Navy Blue” to paint the left hand side of the scarf, and blended it in with Accent “Golden Harvest on the right hand side.  My idea is to eventually make it look like it transitions from night to day.  When dry, I gave his whole body a wash with GW "Badab Black” wash using a wet brush.

     Next, I worked on the book hanging at his side.  I painted the pages with Americana “Bleached Sand” and the cover with Americana “Bittersweet Chocolate”.   The two wands were painted with Crafter’s Acrylic “Cinnamon Brown”, the stones on their tips were painted with Crafter’s Acrylic “Deep Red”, and Folk Art Platinum Grey", and the sting wraps were painted with “Americana "Khaki Tan”.  I then painted the shoes, belts, all the pouches, and the right end of the scarf, were painted with Black. Next, I painted the medallion around his neck, the buckle on his book strap, and some highlights on the right center of the scarf with the “Golden Harvest”.

     I continued with the “Golden Harvest”, painting the bracelet on his right hand, and the object he holds in his hand. I then painted his hair with Black. Next, I re-painted his under gown with Folk Art Pearl “Aqua Moire”. Then I highlighted his waist wrap and did highlights on the left center part of the scarf with Americana ‘True Blue".  I then highlighted his outer tunic with a mix of the “Purple Passion” and Apple Barrel “Apple Lavender”. At this point I used Ceramcoat “Bronze” to paint his medallion, book buckle bracelet, and the object in his hand.  Then, after everything a while to dry, I gave the book, wands, and his face and hands, all  a wash with GW “Agrax Earthshade” wash using a wet brush.  I also gave his light blue under robes a wash with Iron Wind Metals “Dark Blue” ink using a wet brush.

   When the wash and ink were dry, I work on his face; painting his eyes, and then highlighting his skin with Americana “Terra Cotta”. I highlighted his hair and his belts, shoes, and pouches with Citadel “The Fang”, and then did lighter highlights on his hair with Folk Art “Cloudy Day”.  I worked on highlighting the right hand side of his scarf with first Crafters Acrylic “Bright Yellow”, then Crafter’s Acrylic “Daffodil Yellow,” and then Apple Barrel “Lemon Chiffon” at the very end. I also painted the little tab bookmarks in his book with the “Deep Red”, and the “True Blue”. Next, I highlighted his under-robe with a mix of the “Aqua Moire” and White. I also painted the rock slabs he is standing on with Americana “Zinc”.
    Next, I highlighted the pages in the book with Crafter’s Acrylic “Light Antique White”.  I highlighted the wands with Americana “Sable Brown”, and the cord wraps holding the stones on the ends with the “Bleached Sand”.  I highlighted the red rock with Americana “Tangerine”, and the white rock with White.

     I drybrushed the rocks with first Americana “Neutral Grey”, then Crafter’s Acrylic “Storm Cloud Grey”, and lastly Folk Art “Platinum Grey”.  I couldn’t quite figure out what the two little rectangles on his chest were, so I painted them as scraps of paper with the “Bleached Sand”, and added a little script to them with Black.  I then painted the borders of the other tunic, and his necklace, with Folk Art Metallics “Gun Metal”, and then highlighted them with Folk Art “Silver Sterling”.  I highlighted all the parts I had painted “Bronze, using Ceramcoat "14K Gold”.   Next, I added a moon, stars, and the sun to the scarf using White. I also used the White to tough up the non-rock portions of the base.        When everything had overnight to dry, I gave the figure a coat of Ceramcoat “Matte Varnish” early the next morning.  Midday, I flocked the white areas with Woodland Scenics “Snow” flock and the next day I sprayed the figure with Testor’s Dullcote.

     I’m happy with how this figure turned out.  I think he has a good mystic look to him, and will do good as a Soothsayer.

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Colonial Combat Patrol(TM) Play Test

Buck

Counting casualties

Counting casualties

Last weekend several HAWKs joined me in a combined Colonial and Napoleonic play test day for Combat Patrol™ supplements.  Dave has been working on a Boer and Zulu supplement for Combat Patrol™, but because of his busy schedule we had been unable to test some of his ideas.  In particular, Dave has been concerned that there are no formal leaders at lower echelons during this time period.  In the British Army, for instance, the lowest level corporal would be in control of 25 or 30 infantrymen.  This span of control was probably sufficient when units fought in lines, but is not suited for small skirmishes.  My feeling is that three or more soldiers is a formation and someone would be designated as being in charge.  Anyway, Dave has developed an interesting concept for leader in the game that provided a different flavor.  I think there are some ambiguities and second-order effects that have to be identified and resolved, but it worked fine.

The table set up for the colonial game

The table set up for the colonial game

The purpose of the day was more about the rules than the scenarios, but we were also looking to have some fun.  In order to test as much as possible, we had Boers and Zulus against the British.  The Boers were on the side of the creek in the foreground, and the Zulus were on the far side of the creek.  The game very quickly turned into two separate games with little interaction.  I commanded the British on the far side of the creek facing Chris’ and Dave’s Zulus.  Duncan controlled the British on the near side of the creek, facing Mike’s Boers.

Early in the game; most of my British are still strung out on the road

Early in the game; most of my British are still strung out on the road

Zulus advance on my British infantry in a hasty defensive position

Zulus advance on my British infantry in a hasty defensive position

The situation for the British on both sides of the creek were in a difficult situation, with the enemy on both sides.  Against the Zulus I was facing superior numbers with most of my men scattered and in the open.  The scenario began with a single section of British infantry in a hasty defensive position, but the rest of my forces were strung out along the road.

Chris' Zulus emerge from the scrub to attack my British

Chris’ Zulus emerge from the scrub to attack my British

Chris had a few riflemen,  but he had his typical luck, and most of his rifles went out of ammunition early.  In this scenario, Dave determined that an out of ammunition result would be permanent.  Chris then quickly charged out of the scrub and toward my forces.  I tried to seek cover behind the wall you see along the right.  That helped a little, but there was nothing to stop three units of Zulus from circling around my flanks and overwhelming that section of British infantry.

The battle rages

The battle rages

I was busy on the Zulu side, so I didn’t get to see much of what was happening on the Boer side.  I was very pleased with the way the rules seemed to work for the Zulus.  When I had British in hasty positions, the Zulus had difficulty.  Where my infantry was caught in the open, the Zulus were able to circle around my flanks and overwhelm me.  This felt right.

Dave's Zulus swarming against my British infantry

Dave’s Zulus swarming against my British infantry

At one point, Dave was throwing units at my British in the defensive positions.  The section in the foreground is about half strength.  They began in the open and had to fight their way to the defensive position.  Once there, the Zulus were unable to dislodge them.  Even when they had 2:1 odds in the hand to hand, the defensive position provide enough benefit that I was often able to push them  back.  You can see the white rubber bands on several of the Zulu figures.  Each band represents a wound.  When wounds are greater than or equal to the figure’s Endurance attribute (typically 3), the figure is killed.  You can also see some black rubber bands.  These indicate stuns.  When a figure is wounded, it is also stunned.  It is not allowed to take any actions until it takes an action to remove the stun marker.

The fighting gets desperate

The fighting gets desperate

Dave brought more Zulu units to bear, and threatened to destroy this section and my sergeant within the defensive position.

An overhead view of the fight between the British and Zulus

An overhead view of the fight between the British and Zulus

This shot is about mid game.  You can see the British section in the foreground still trying to make it to cover.  You can also see the British on the left beginning to circle around my British section at the wall while other Zulu units are advancing toward my Gatling gun at the top of the image.  I never did get the Gatling gun into operation before the Zulus overran it.

One of my British sections is overwhelmed by Chris' Zulus

One of my British sections is overwhelmed by Chris’ Zulus

It took several turns, and I was able to inflict some casualties, but this Section of infantry, caught in the open, died to the last man.

I quite enjoyed the game, and I felt the rules worked pretty well for the period with Dave’s tweaks.  Some of us are still not convinced of the needed for the added complexity Dave has introduced for leaders and command, but it worked fine.  It will be included in the supplement as an optional rule.  This play test also gave us a chance to make sure that we were being completely consistent between Dave’s supplement and Duncan’s Napoleonic supplement.  We need a couple more play tests, but in general I think the supplement is shaping up.

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Napoleonic Combat Patrol(TM) Play Test

Buck

My French firing from the scrub at the British

My French firing from the scrub at the British

Last weekend a bunch of the HAWKs came to my war room to conduct another play test of the Napoleonic supplement for Combat Patrol™ that Duncan is writing.  This play test focused on confirming the last batch of changes and looking at cavalry vs. infantry and cavalry vs. cavalry fights.

The supply train being ambushed

The supply train being ambushed

The scenario involved a British supply train being ambushed by a French force.  The force sizes were about equal, but the British were in a tough situation, having enemy on both sides of them.  While the skirmishing took place, the wagon train continued to work its way across the table.  While the intent of this event was less about the game and more about the rules, I think the British might have eventually gotten the wagon train off the table.

Another view of my French with the wagon train escaping in the distance

Another view of my French with the wagon train escaping in the distance

Chris Palmer posted some additional pictures here.

The rules are shaping up nicely.  The next play test will involve artillery.  I have made some suggestions to Duncan about information that probably needs to be on the unit record to help players remember the differences in movement and terrain effects between infantry and cavalry, in open or close formation.  The supplement is getting very close to being releasable.

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