Daily Archives: November 16, 2015

Familiars- Ferret & Dog: Figures 179 & 180 of 265

Chris Palmer

    This past week I spent most of my free time working on a building for Forstgrave, so I ended up with not much time for figure painting.  So, as I saw the days passing by, I realized I better prep a simple figure to paint, so I actually grabbed two, the Ferret and Dog from the Familiars Set.
       I prepped the figures in the usual way; soaking them in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish-soap added, then giving them a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying them.  I then glued the Ferret to a 5/8" black primed fender washer and the Dog to a black-primed ¾" fender washers with Aleene’s Tacky glue, and then glued the washer-mounted figures to a tongue depressor with a couple drops of the Elmer’s glue.

       I began by painting the ferret with Folk Art “Barn Wood”.  I then painted his front and back with Black, as well as his mask.  I then drybrushed his back with the Black.  Next, I mixed some White with the “Barn Wood” and painted his face and muzzle around the mask.

     For the dog, I decided he looked a lot like a German  Shepherd, so I began by painting him Accent “Mustard Seed”. I then drybrushed his tail, underbelly, collar, and the backs of his legs with Cermcoat “Maple Syrup Tan”.

     I then painted the Ferret’s nose with Americana “Shading Flesh”, and then drybrushed his Black areas with Crafters Acrylic “Storm Cloud Grey”.
    For the Shepherd, I painted his markings and his muzzle and eyes Black, and then used Americana “Buttermilk’ to add some highlight areas to the rest of his fur.
       After the figures had the afternoon to dry, I gave them a coat of Ceramcoat "Matte Varnish” in the evening.  The next morning I flocked their bases, and later that afternoon I sprayed them with Testor’s Dullcote.

     These turned out pretty good I think.   Hopefully, this upcoming week I can get back to completing the Chronoscope set.

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Desperate fighting for the southern end of the sunken road.

Desperate fighting for the southern end of the sunken road.

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HAWKs supporting a signal battalion senior leader development…

HAWKs supporting a signal battalion senior leader development event.

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HAWKs supporting a signal battalion senior leader development…

HAWKs supporting a signal battalion senior leader development event.

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HAWKs supporting a signal battalion senior leader development…

HAWKs supporting a signal battalion senior leader development event.

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HAWKs supporting a signal battalion senior leader development…

HAWKs supporting a signal battalion senior leader development event.

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Game Designers’ Corner: Thoughts on Volley Fire

Buck

I like mechanics that “feel right” as well as being good approximations of the physical effect being modeled.

I had a recent Email exchange with Lori Brom — just prior to the death of her dad, Larry.  In my note to her I mentioned that I might have been the only person who really liked the original volley fire mechanic in The Sword and the Flame.  For those of you who don’t remember it, her it is:

(I intentionally only show part of the card and didn’t put a lot of effort into making it look good, because I don’t have permission to reproduce it.)  So for British rifles, as an example, I would roll a SINGLE six-sided die.  If the roll was a “4,” the result is “1/3.”  That means that I would count up the number of firing figures and for every three figures, I would inflict one casualty on the enemy.  Then you would draw cards to tell if the casualties were kills, wounds, leaders, etc.  It was the “1/3,” “1/4,” etc. mechanic that appealed to me.  Then the question arose, “what about remainders.”  In the original rules, reminders were lost.  In an issue of the Heliograph, someone proposed a method by which you rolled on a separate chart with a d10 to see if the remainder turned into an extra casualty or not.

Clearly many folks who played TSAF didn’t like this mechanic, because in subsequent editions of the rules, Larry moved to a d10-based mechanic, and I think a die roll for each figure.  But the elegance of the original approach — as well as the single die roll — always made a lot of intuitive sense to me.  When you fire by volley, you KNOW most of those bullets don’t strike a target.  This mechanic replicated in an elegant way that felt like volley fire to me.

When we were developing GASLIGHT I initially toyed with this idea, but dropped it in favor of rolling for each figure.  I figured Larry know what he was doing when he dropped this mechanic from TSAF, probably the single most successful set of wargaming rules ever.  As I said earlier, I like mechanics that “feel right” as well as being good approximations of the physical effect being modeled.  To me, this felt right.

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