Daily Archives: November 9, 2015

Fall-In Report: Happy Birthday General Grant by GASLIGHT game

Chris Palmer   Friday night at Fall-In I ran my “Happy Birthday General Grant by GASLIGHT” game, using 25mm figures and GASLIGHT rules.   I had only run this game once before for a friend’s birthday gaming day, so was a little unsure going in to it how it would turn out.  I shouldn’t have worried…

Union Dignitaries, and proud Army Cooks, pose with the huge cake prior to the Confederates crashing the party.

      The set-up for the game is this:  Union Army Cooks have made a huge birthday cake to celebrate General Grant’s birthday, and have shipped it via railroad car to a small town near the front, where a small celebration is being held; with troops on parade, along with the latest steam-powered technology, and assorted honored dignitaries.

The surprise is sprung: Rebel Mole Machines burrow up from the earth, with the Whiskey Wagon right in front of them.

      The Confederates have caught wind of this event, and see it as a golden opportunity; so they plot an assault to break up the celebration.    The game was designed for 6 players, and I got three folks registered who showed up, and was able to corral three HAWKs into filling the empty spaces.

The mobile part of the Rebel force enters from the nearby woods.

      The Confederates were tasked with three objectives: kidnap General Grant,  steal the wagon full of whisky that had been brought to the celebration, and steal the train carrying the cake.   To help them, they had two steam-powered Mole Machines that would allow two thirds of their force to enter very near the Yankee celebration.

An overview of the table as things get underway.

     At the beginning of the game the Confederate players could put their Mole Machines anywhere on their side of the table behind an imaginary line drawn across the table from the top of the corn field on the Rebel left.  They placed the two machines, one right of center and one further right.  They then rolled a scatter d10 for each machine to determine where it actually came up (its tough navigating underground!) and ended up with both of them almost side by side on the far right.   They then were able to disembark one unit per turn.   The remaining third of the Rebel force needed to enter from a woodline along the Confederate table edge.

Rebel troops start to drag away the Whiskey Wagon, as the Wagon Master charges into combat with them.

    With the Whisky Wagon directly in front of them, it became the obvious first target for the Rebels, and both sides began to converge on that area.  From that point on, all heck broke loose.  A rebel unit got its hands on the Whisky Wagon, but the Wagon Master was right there, and charged into them with a vengeance, dropping Rebs left and right.  Nobody was taking his whisky!  This running battle continued for a short while, but then  a bad die roll and a rebel bayonet, and the Wagon master fell.

The Army Cooks melee with the Electro-Cannon crew.

    Meanwhile, the Union Cooks had charged the crew of a nearby Rebel Electro-cannon, and engaged the crew while they were setting up the weapon.  A multi-turn melee ensued.  With one cook, and a cannoneer locked in continual combat for almost the whole game.  Eventually the remaining cook perished when help arrived to aid the cannon crew.

Another table view as the action reaches it’s height. 

      Meanwhile, General Grant had arrived to help regain the Whisky Wagon. Nobody was taking his whisky!  He charged his horse into combat, only to roll a 20 for his Scuffle and so promptly fell off his horse.  The Rebel he was fighting promptly wacked him with his musket butt, knocking him out.  A long battle for control of the unconscious general now developed.

General Grant wades into the fray (in a kepi for a change!)

    As this was going on, the Rebels had the bright idea to bring up an officer in a steam-powered mechanical suit to help pull away the Whiskey Wagon, only to have the mechanical suit fail its Sustain roll right as it reached the wagon. So, it now not only couldn’t pull the wagon, it was blocking the troops that were pushing it.  Eventually the crew from the nearby Rebel Volley Cannon had to come and push the immobile officer out of the way of the wagon so it could continue to be pushed by hand.

The Air Cavalry (and Bicycle Dragoons) to the rescue! (Note the lone Union Cook still meleeing in the lower right of the photo!)

      In the end, the Rebels had gotten the Whisky Wagon safely away, but had lost General Grant to a very strong Lady Zouave trooper in the final moments.  Also, the train crew that the Confederates had brought along to drive the train away, had been ambushed and killed by the Union Dignitaries.  So the game was deemed a Union 2-1 victory.  General Grant ended up with a sore head, and no whiskey for his birthday!

The chaotic scene near the end. 

     I have to say, as a GM, this was one of the most fun GASLIGHT games I have ever run.  A perfect combination of players and events.   The outcome of all the victory conditions was up in the air until almost the end, and the many catastrophes and near-catastrophes made for much hilarity.  I look forward to running this game again at Cold Wars.

via One More Gaming Project http://ift.tt/1MHL922
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/1RJbhhq
via IFTTT

Advertisements

Dita, Steampunk Witch: Figure 178 or 265

Chris Palmer

   This week I finished Dita, Steampunk Witch, from the Chronoscope Set.  Only one figure let to do from this set.
       I prepped the figure in the usual way; soaking it in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish- soap added, then giving it a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying it.  I then glued the figure to a black-primed 1" fender washers with Aleene’s Tacky glue, and then glued the washer-mounted figure to a tongue depressor with a couple drops of the Elmer’s glue.

      I began by painting the entire figure, and her base, Black.  I then drybrushed it with Folk Art “Settlers Blue”.

     Next, I painted her skin with Americana “Mocha”. Then I painted parts of her outfit with Crafter’s Edition “African Violet”.  I painted her hair with Apple Barrel “Burnt Sienna”, and  the end of her broom with Folk Art “Barnyard Red”

     I then gave her hair, skin, and broom end a wash with Winsor Newton “Peat Brown’ Ink using a wet brush.  When that was dry, I painted her eyes and lips, and then did her skin highlights, with first the "Mocha”, then I mixed some Crafter’s Edition “Flesh” with the “Mocha” and did lighter highlights.   Next, I highlighted her hair with first the base “Burnt Sienna”, then with Americana “Burnt Orange”, I did highlights on the broom with first the base “Barnyard Red”, then with Ameircana “Georgia Clay”.   I then used the “Settlers Blue” to add some more specific highlights on the Black.

     Next, I did the highlights on the purple, first with a mix of the “African Violet” and some Apple Barrel “Apple Lavender”, then with just the plain “Apple Lavender”

   I then worked on the metal parts, painting them first with Ceramcoat “Bronze”, and then going back and doing highlights with Ceramcoat “14K Gold”  I painted the round object on her hat like a headlight, using Folk Art “Medium Grey”, Folk Art “Silver Sterling”, and White highlights.  I also added tiny White highlights to her goggles.
        After the figure had the afternoon to dry, I gave it a coat of Ceramcoat “Matte Varnish” in the evening.  The next morning I flocked the base, and later that afternoon I sprayed the figure with Testor’s Dullcote.

    I’m pleased with how the figure turned out, even though I didn’t get it finished for Halloween. I did notice in the photos, that I didn’t do good coverage with the Dullcote, and there’s still some shiny spots in her clothing folds and recesses.  I’ll have to ht it again with the Dullcote tomorrow.

via All Bones About It http://ift.tt/1WN2QmA
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/1Y0qBtG
via IFTTT

Fall-In: Saturday Morning In the HAWKs Room

Chris Palmer     In the HAWKs room,the action began early Saturday morning at Fall-In with a room full of games and gamers.  Here are a few photos of some of the games

An overview of the room

     I was scheduled to help Buck Surdu and Dave Wood run their double-blind Road to Bastogne game, using 6mm figures and “Look, Sarge, No Charts: WWII” rules.   This was a lot of fun to watch, as gamers play very differently when they don’t have the 1000 ft general ability, and know here all the enemy troops are located.

Buck Surdu, in dark blue shirt, gives the rules briefing to the players

      The game set-up was American forces pushing as quickly as possible down the road to Bastogne to relieve the trapped troops in the city.  The Germans have defenders along the road to stop them.

American forces, move cautiously towards their unseen foe

     The Americana pushed across their entire frontage and were never able to achieve a breaktrough; as the Germans continually melted back into the woods as soon as they were spotted and engaged, only to set up another defensive line a little further back.  In the end, the game was a German victory.

A look at the two identical tables for the double-blind game

  Also being run Saturday morning was Kurt Schlegel’s Assault on Santa’s Village game, using GASLIGHT rules.  This was a crowd favorite with both the kids and parents alike; and it was often standing-room only around the table..

GM, Kurt Schlegel, in yellow shirt, helps one of the young players.

Goblins and evil snowmen move across the town square of Santa’s village

   Another Saturday morning game was  James “Tank” Nickle’s Battle of Pydna 22 June 168 BC, using 10mm figures and “Bear Yourselves Valiantly” rules.

GM, James “Tank” Nickle, in blue t-shirt, helps answers a player’s question

Another look at the forces engaged in the Battle of Pydna

      Also on the schedule was Kevin Fischer’s Clash at the River game using 12mm figures and “Mobile Suit Gundam: The Gravity Front” rules.

GM, Kevin Fischer, in tan shirt, discusses the game with one of his players

via One More Gaming Project http://ift.tt/1XZLyoS
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/1PkTRda
via IFTTT

Fall-In Friday Night: Island of the Lizardmen

Chris Palmer   Friday night at Fall-In I ran my “Battle for the Island of the Lizardmen” game, using 10mm figures and “Bear Yourselves Valiantly” rules.  The set-up for the game is that the Dwarves have allied with the Lizardmen in order to gain access to their volcanic jungle island, to use the volcanic power to construct a super weapon.  The Elves have found about about this, and have sent an expeditionary force to put an end to it.

        The game was intended for 6 players, but unfortunately we only got 4.  So, I jumped in to fill  the fifth spot, and an Elf player took two commands. The Elves have three objectives they need to accomplish: destroy the under-construction super weapon, destroy the Lizardmen village, and destroy the Dwarves’ encampment.

      Both sides have deployment problems they must overcome. For the Elves, they can only disembark two bases of troops from their boats per turn; and for the Lizards, they have to move their troops through dense jungle to meet the Elvish threat, which greatly slows them down.

   The Elven plan quickly fell apart, as many of their troops became bogged down in fighting the Lizards in the jungle, and another Elf force, attempting a flanking manure, became slowed down by a bridge crossing. Then, due to long range flanking artillery fire from the Dwarven encampment (which the Elves chose to bypass) the Elves crossing the bridge failed their morale check and ended up retreating back over it, just as they were reaching the other side.

     The unfortunate tactical setbacks, combined with very cold Elf dice, resulted in a Lizardman victory; with the Dwarf-Lizard alliance retaining control of all three objectives.
  Everyone seemed to have fun though; and as a GM, it was nice to get a chance to command a few troops on the table as well.

via One More Gaming Project http://ift.tt/1GT3I7l
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/1QdZbiP
via IFTTT

Combat Patrol debuts at Fall In

Buck

Me explaining a rule during the Fall In Combat Patrol debut game

Me explaining a rule during the Fall In Combat Patrol debut game

Combat Patrol was released las week (see previous post and information here:  http://ift.tt/1ScfES1).  I ran two games featuring the rules at Fall In this weekend, and Eric Schlegel ran another.  There was to be a fourth game using Combat Patrol for the Napoleonic Wars, but the game was cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances by the GM.

A view of a German halftrack and infantry working their way around the American left during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

A view of a German halftrack and infantry working their way around the American left during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

Both games went extremely well.  The first game was over full, but I managed to cram everyone into the game.  I had a couple of players from the first game come back to play again in the second game — including a small child who was able to control his own forces and work the rules without assistance.

A view of a German halftrack and infantry working their way around the American left during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

A view of a German halftrack and infantry working their way around the American left during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

The two scenarios were linked.  The ending positions from the first scenario were the starting positions for the second scenario.  The first scenario involved a German platoon and an American platoon bumping into each other in a small village at an important crossroads.  Both sides had the objective of gaining and maintaining an advantageous position before reinforcements arrived (the second scenario).

A machine-gun opens fire from a window during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

A machine-gun opens fire from a window during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

Between the scenarios I reconstituted some of the squads the had been badly shot up, but mostly I left the forces where they were at the end of the first scenario.  I think this worked really well.  The starting positions for this second scenario were in better and more interesting positions than I probably would have put them if I was running the second scenario without the benefit of the first scenario.

The call before the storm: The setup of the French village for the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

The call before the storm: The setup of the French village for the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

This picture (above) shows the general layout of the table before the fighting began.  This is from the perspective of the Americans.

Dave Wood helping explain the rules during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

Dave Wood helping explain the rules during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

Both scenarios were closely run affairs, with neither side having a significant advantage until toward the end of the second scenario.

An American squad on patrol during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

An American squad on patrol during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

In the picture (above) you can see the command dice next to the three elements that make up the US squad.  This was their starting position for the first scenario.  This squad was patrolling up the road when the fun began.

The roof of one of the buildings is removed to show the Americans occupying firing positions inside during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

The roof of one of the buildings is removed to show the Americans occupying firing positions inside during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

In the picture (above) you can see that part of a US squad was in the woods on the left, and the other half of that squad, including a bazooka team had the up position in the building.  The player thought he had a great position for his bazooka.  When the German halftrack rushed past the opening, the bazooka team passed its Reaction roll to fire, but THEN the player realized there was no window on that side of the building!  We had a lot of fun at his expense after that.

Germans and Americans toss grenades at each other over an immobile halftrack.

Germans and Americans toss grenades at each other over an immobile halftrack.

Since his bazooka as ineffective, the team in the woods hit the halftrack with a captured Panzerfaust, knocking out the driver and the forward machine-gun.  Then the Americans assaulted it.  The Germans had dismounted, so for a while the two groups tossed grenades over the vehicle at each other.

A German squad works their way up their left flank through some hedge-lined fields during the Fall In Debut of Combat Patrol.

A German squad works their way up their left flank through some hedge-lined fields during the Fall In Debut of Combat Patrol.

Everyone seemed to grasp the rules quick, and they all seemed to have a good time.  There were no glaring issues — which would have been disappointing after three and a half years of development.  All in all, I was very satisfied with the results.

A Pz. IV works its way toward a squad of Americans taking cover behind a brick wall during the Fall In Debut of Combat Patrol.

A Pz. IV works its way toward a squad of Americans taking cover behind a brick wall during the Fall In Debut of Combat Patrol.

There were some die-hard fans of other rules in the the two games, but I didn’t hear any of the “in rules ___, they do this…” types of comments, which I thought was a good sign.  A number of folks asked how they could get the rules, and I had some prepared flyers with QR codes that they could scan to go straight to the rules.  I did not see a bump in sales over the weekend, but most of the flyers I posted around the conventions kept disappearing.  Presumable they were taken by folks interested in the rules and not by competitors.

Me explaining a combat results during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

Me explaining a combat results during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

A Sherman sneaks up behind a Pz IV that had gotten stuck on a brick wall and brews it up.

A Sherman sneaks up behind a Pz IV that had gotten stuck on a brick wall and brews it up.

There was a lot of dancing around between the German Pz. IV, the US Sherman, and the US Stuart.  The Pz. IV got stuck trying to climb over this brick wall.  Then the Sherman pulled up behind it, put a round through the engine, and knocked it out.  The smoke shown is scary painted cotton batting glued to battery-operated tea lights with black bases.

A German squad moving into position during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

A German squad moving into position during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

A German fire team advances to take up a position inside a building during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

A German fire team advances to take up a position inside a building during the Fall In debut of Combat Patrol.

I probably lost a few sales by not having decks of cards in the dealer area.  I also got some complaints over the weekend from someone who thought the game was too expensive in England with shipping costs.  Still, I want to let this electronic-only distribution run its course for a little while.

We pay as much for rules shipped to the US, and it’s unlikely Brits will buy a set of rules written by a Yank anyway.  I have attempted to reduce the risk by providing the YouTube how-to video and by making the basic rules free so that prospective customers can read them before purchasing the cards.  That’s the best I can do.

In addition to my two Combat Patrol games, Eric Schlegel ran a game with the rules as well.  Several of the HAWKs ran a series of games on the same town table all weekend, including Battleground, Dr. Who, and others.

from Buck’s Blog http://ift.tt/1ScfGJG
via IFTTT
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/1HqpYWa
via IFTTT

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: