Monthly Archives: September 2015

Buck Surdu’s “Combat Patrol” Coming Soon!

Chris Palmer I just wanted to give you all a heads up about this exciting new set of rules by Buck Surdu.  I had a chance to take part in the playtesting for theses, and I can say that they really are fun and innovative.

After nearly three years of development, Combat Patrol™ is nearing completion.  The game features some really innovative mechanics that streamline play and reduce table cutter.  I have also play tested it in numerous convention games.  My gaming group has even begun adapting it to other historical periods.  There are many good WWII skirmish rules on the market.  So what makes this interesting and unique?
In developing Combat Patrol™ I developed the G.A.M.E.R.™ “engine.”  Key features of the engine are:
  • The Double Random Activation™ mechanism provides the unpredictability and drama of card-based activation without the drawbacks. This activation mechanism was originally developed for Battles by GASLIGHT and was refined during the development of Look, Sarge, No Charts titles.  The mechanism uses cards for activation but ensures that multiple players are acting at the same time.
  • No big yellow or pink chart cards cluttering up your beautiful gaming tables.  Each player needs one or two 3″x5″ cards with the information about his units, including their weapons and equipment.   Other than those, there are no chart cards.  The back of these unit records includes the modifiers for hand-to-hand combat and terrain effects on movement.  After a game or two, players rarely need to refer to these, so two unit records can be taped back to back for even less clutter.
  • Combat resolution is resolved by flipping cards.  Players read different sections of the cards in the Action Deck depending on what they are trying to do:  shooting, resolving hits, “rolling” to penetrate enemy vehicles, hand-to-hand combat, movement, and morale.  In development, I took a series of charts and then broke them apart to fit on an Action Deck of 50 cards.  Flipping a card is essentially the same as rolling a die and looking up the result on a table.  The difference is that you don’t have to do all that table look up.  Flip a card and determine whether you got a hit.  If so, flip the next card to see which target figure was hit, how severely, and whether he is protected by cover.
  • Cover is represented explicitly.  Instead of cover providing a negative modifier to hit, if you get a hit, when you flip the next card in the Action Deck, you look for cover icons.  If the target figure is in the type of cover indicated on the card, instead of being wounded or incapacitate he ducks back behind cover and is stunned.  While the use of cover as a to-hit modifier and the process in Combat Patrol™ can be mathematically equivalent, there is something intuitively appealing to knowing that the window sill deflected that round that would have otherwise hit your figure.  In play tests, this explicit representation of cover has made players make better use of cover while maneuvering their squads.
  • Messy “opportunity fire” rules are replaced by a simple reaction mechanism.
  • Somewhat randomized movement speeds based on the Guts level of the unit or its leader.
  • The G.A.M.E.R.™ engine name is an acronym for the attributes which describe figures in Combat Patrol™: Guts (morale), Accuracy (shooting), Melee (hand-to-hand combat), Endurance (how many wounds a figure can take), and Reaction.  The game master can “sculpt” a unit to fit a historical scenario.
  • Playable on multiple levels of resolution.  At the lowest level, all the figures in a unit have the same attributes.  At the highest level, each figure can have different attributes.  The levels of resolution can be mixed so that the Commando unit has more detail than the installation security personnel.  The allows games that have a historical feel as well as those with a more cinematic feel.
  • Rules for replacements of personnel and equipment between scenarios enable players to represent mini-campaigns.
  • Ground scale is 1 inch = 5 yards, pretty close to the scale of the 28mm figures I used in play testing.
  • The basic rules are just eight pages!  And that includes several pictorial examples of firing and grenade resolution that fill almost a full page themselves.

Combat Patrol™ will soon be available through DriveThruCards on durable, premium stock cards.  It is helpful for each player or pair of players to have an Action Deck to speed play.  On DriveThru customers may purchase either set A or set B of the cards.  Each set includes four Action Decks (supporting four to eight players), with different colored backs to keep them separated, and an Activation Deck.  Purchasing both set A and set B will give you eight different backs, supporting eight to sixteen players for those really large games.  The basic rules and an introductory scenario will be a free .pdf download from DriveThru as well.  The advanced rules and vehicle rules will be a second download.  In this way, the rules will be available worldwide without customers having to hunt for them in retail outlets.

Because everything will be downloadable, there won’t be a glossy hard-cover book full of eye candy.  It’s just a solid set of rules that has gone through several years of development and testing.  I think, however, if people give the rules a try, they will really see how Combat Patrol™ results in a streamlined, enjoyable World War II skirmish game with all the nuances of any other set of rules but with most of the complexity removed.

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Barrage is Less Than Two Weeks Away!

Buck

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Combat Patrol Imminent

Buck

After nearly three years of development, Combat Patrol™ is nearing completion.  The game features some really innovative mechanics that streamline play and reduce table cutter.  I have also play tested it in numerous convention games.  My gaming group has even begun adapting it to other historical periods.  There are many good WWII skirmish rules on the market.  So what makes this interesting and unique?

In developing Combat Patrol™ I developed the G.A.M.E.R.™ “engine.”  Key features of the engine are:

  • The Double Random Activation™ mechanism provides the unpredictability and drama of card-based activation without the drawbacks. This activation mechanism was originally developed for Battles by GASLIGHT and was refined during the development of Look, Sarge, No Charts titles.  The mechanism uses cards for activation but ensures that multiple players are acting at the same time.
  • No big yellow or pink chart cards cluttering up your beautiful gaming tables.  Each player needs one or two 3″x5″ cards with the information about his units, including their weapons and equipment.   Other than those, there are no chart cards.  The back of these unit records includes the modifiers for hand-to-hand combat and terrain effects on movement.  After a game or two, players rarely need to refer to these, so two unit records can be taped back to back for even less clutter.
  • Combat resolution is resolved by flipping cards.  Players read different sections of the cards in the Action Deck depending on what they are trying to do:  shooting, resolving hits, “rolling” to penetrate enemy vehicles, hand-to-hand combat, movement, and morale.  In development, I took a series of charts and then broke them apart to fit on an Action Deck of 50 cards.  Flipping a card is essentially the same as rolling a die and looking up the result on a table.  The difference is that you don’t have to do all that table look up.  Flip a card and determine whether you got a hit.  If so, flip the next card to see which target figure was hit, how severely, and whether he is protected by cover.
  • Cover is represented explicitly.  Instead of cover providing a negative modifier to hit, if you get a hit, when you flip the next card in the Action Deck, you look for cover icons.  If the target figure is in the type of cover indicated on the card, instead of being wounded or incapacitate he ducks back behind cover and is stunned.  While the use of cover as a to-hit modifier and the process in Combat Patrol™ can be mathematically equivalent, there is something intuitively appealing to knowing that the window sill deflected that round that would have otherwise hit your figure.  In play tests, this explicit representation of cover has made players make better use of cover while maneuvering their squads.
  • Messy “opportunity fire” rules are replaced by a simple reaction mechanism.
  • Somewhat randomized movement speeds based on the Guts level of the unit or its leader.
  • The G.A.M.E.R.™ engine name is an acronym for the attributes which describe figures in Combat Patrol™: Guts (morale), Accuracy (shooting), Melee (hand-to-hand combat), Endurance (how many wounds a figure can take), and Reaction.  The game master can “sculpt” a unit to fit a historical scenario.
  • Playable on multiple levels of resolution.  At the lowest level, all the figures in a unit have the same attributes.  At the highest level, each figure can have different attributes.  The levels of resolution can be mixed so that the Commando unit has more detail than the installation security personnel.  The allows games that have a historical feel as well as those with a more cinematic feel.
  • Rules for replacements of personnel and equipment between scenarios enable players to represent mini-campaigns.
  • Ground scale is 1 inch = 5 yards, pretty close to the scale of the 28mm figures I used in play testing.
  • The basic rules are just eight pages!  And that includes several pictorial examples of firing and grenade resolution that fill almost a full page themselves.

Combat Patrol™ will soon be available through DriveThruCards on durable, premium stock cards.  It is helpful for each player or pair of players to have an Action Deck to speed play.  On DriveThru customers may purchase either set A or set B of the cards.  Each set includes four Action Decks (supporting four to eight players), with different colored backs to keep them separated, and an Activation Deck.  Purchasing both set A and set B will give you eight different backs, supporting eight to sixteen players for those really large games.  The basic rules and an introductory scenario will be a free .pdf download from DriveThru as well.  The advanced rules and vehicle rules will be a second download.  In this way, the rules will be available worldwide without customers having to hunt for them in retail outlets.

Because everything will be downloadable, there won’t be a glossy hard-cover book full of eye candy.  It’s just a solid set of rules that has gone through several years of development and testing.  I think, however, if people give the rules a try, they will really see how Combat Patrol™ results in a streamlined, enjoyable World War II skirmish game with all the nuances of any other set of rules but with most of the complexity removed.

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Rosie, Chronotechnician: Figure 172 of 265

Chris Palmer

     This week I continued working on the big Bones I Chronoscope set, and completed the Rosie, Chronotechnician, figure.
        I prepped the figure in the usual way; soaking it in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish- soap added, then giving it a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying.   I then glued the figure to a 1" black-primed fender washer with Aleene’s Tacky glue, and glued the washer to a tongue depressor with a couple drops of Elmer’s White Glue.

      I began by painting her skin with Americana “Mocha”.  I then painted her shirt with Crafters Acrylic “Pure Pumpkin”, and her overalls with Crafters Acrylic “Navy Blue”.

      Next, I painted her gloves with Apple Barrel “Burnt Sienna”, and her boots and toolbelt with Americana “Territorial Beige”.  I then painted her neckerchief with Crafters Acrylic “Christmas Red”, and then did her hair with Folk Art “Dark Brown”,

           I let the paint dry a bit, an then I gave the figure a wash with Winsor Newton “Peat Brown” ink, using a wet brush.  As best I could, I tried to avoid getting any on her blue overalls.  When the wash was dry, I painted her gun, communications head set, and some of the tool handles Black. I also painted some of the tool handles with Americana “Zinc”.    Then I painted her boot augmentations and belt buckle with Accent “Princely Pewter”.  I then went back and painted the side supports of her boot augmentations with Apple Barrel “Yellow”.  When the “Yellow” was dry, I went back over it and painted thin slanted black stripes.

     Next, I used some Duncan “Slate Blue” to drybrush the gun and (carefully) the comms headset. I then took some of the “Zinc”, and highlighted the ammo clip on the gun.  I then did highlights on her hair with Americana “Sable Brown”, and followed with painting her eyes.  I then did her lips with Some Americana “Shading Flesh” with a little of the “Mocha” mixed in, then worked on highlighting all her skin with the base “Mocha”, then mixing in a little Crafters Acrylic “Flesh” to do lighter highlights.  Now it was on to her clothing, highlighting first her shirt with the base “Pure Pumpkin”, then some Americana “Tangerine”. Next, was her overalls, which I highlighted first with a mix of the “Navy Blue” and the “Slate Blue”, and then just pure “Slate Blue”.  Her gloves I highlighted with Crafters Edition “Orange Spice”, and her boots and tool belt with “Americana "Butter Pecan”. I used the base “Christmas Red” to highlight her neckerchief.
     Next, I added a red dot to the laser sight on the gun, and another to her headset, using the “Christmas Red”.  I also painted a part of the headset with Crafters Acrylic “Storm Cloud Grey”.  I then highlighted her boot augmentations, her belt buckle, and painted some of the tool and headset parts, with Cermacoat “Metallic Pewter”.  Then I took a some “White”, and added little reflection highlights to the red dots and the “Storm Cloud Grey”.  I finished up by painting her base with Cermacoat “Walnut”.
      After the figure had the afternoon to dry, I gave it a coat of Ceramcoat “Matte Varnish” in the evening.  The next morning I flocked the base using a sand mixture and a little static grass, and later that afternoon I sprayed the figure with Testor’s Dullcote.

     I’m happy with the way she turned out.  The mouth was molded a little funky, and that shows a bit, but in general I think it’s a pretty nice figure.

Figure 172 of 265: Complete

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A Little Painting

Buck

I was camping this weekend with the Venture Crew, but I had a chance on Sunday to finish up a few figures that I have been working on for a week.  These are from Pulp Figures.  Four are from a sleuths pack, and the fifth, with the Tommy Gun, is “Stash Gable,” which was a promotional figure.

Just this week, I received in the mail a set of painting glasses from Carson, with a built in LED light.  These make a HUGE difference.  For the past couple of years, I have had a lot of trouble getting enough light, no matter what I tried.  These “cheaters” have four different lens sets for magnification from 1.5x to 3.5x.  Most importantly, the built-in LED lamp really illuminates where I am painting.

In addition, in my painting box, I had some RAFM seated figures that have been in need of painting for a couple of years.

These will find their way into vehicles in my Granville pulp and gangster games.

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GALACTA: Another Trip Down Memory Lane

Chris Palmer    In a recent discussion on the Reaper Forum ,the topic came up of the old Sci-Fi miniatures game called “GALACTA”, which was produced by Heritage Miniatures.  I got the basic game set for this game for Christmas in either 1980 or ‘81, and I can remember spending a good part of Christmas afternoon painting the figures.

The orignal rules sheet that came with the boxed set.

  So, I was inspired to dig my old GALACTA figures out of a box full of assorted gaming stuff I never use, and look through some cabinet drawers to find where I had stuffed the old rules sheets; and spend a little while with my memories from the beginning years of my journey in the hobby of miniatures gaming.  While not the first miniatures I ever owned (that would be 15mm ACW) , these were certainly some of the earliest, and in turn some of the earliest figure painting I ever did that I still own. Needless to say, my skills have improved in the past 35 years. And, I truly think there is a certain charm and character to these old sculpts.  In fact, I’m happy to report some of these old warriors still are part of my current armies.  The “Octopoid” figures that I got in that first basic set, still make up part of my force of Wellsian Martians for my VSF on Mars armies.
   

Rebel Leader, Rebel Adventurer, and Woman Assault Leader

Stormtroopers and Storm Trooper Officer.  These were the ones i got in the original boxed game  set

At a later date I added another squad

A pair of Alien Squogs (Squirrel Dog) and a big lizard guy.  One of the Squogs came with the boxed game set, the other was part of a later purchased Aliens blister, along with the big lizard guy.

Planetary Striker Officer and Planetary Strikers

2 Security Bots and Warbot

Octopoid Grenadier, Section Leader, and Cannonier. Note the updated bases to use with my current troops for Mars.

The original painting guide and scenarios sheet.

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Alistrilee, Elf Archer: Bones II Figure

Chris Palmer

      This week I also completed the Alistrilee, female elf archer, figure from the Bones II Core Set.  I had actually put this figure in my Bones “out” box when I first sorted my Kickstarter, to sell at a con flea market. But since I have been bitten by the Frostgrave bug recently, I pawed through the “out” box to look for suitable candidates who look attired for winter adventuring.  I had culled this figure originally as it is rather plain and lacks a dynamic pose, and I already had a selection of elf archers from Bones I, but her hood and cape made her perfect for exploring the ruins of Felstad.

       I prepped the figure in the usual way; soaking it in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish- soap added, then giving it a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying.   I then glued the figure to a 1" white-primed fender washer with Aleene’s Tacky glue, and glued the washer to a tongue depressor with a couple drops of Elmer’s White Glue.

   I began by painting her under armor Black, as I had originally intended to drybrush it with a metal color.  Then I changed my mind, as archers in Frostgrave wear leather armor, and not metal. So, I decided to do it in a non-metal color to look perhaps like some sort of dyed scale leather armor.  I chose Duncan “Slate Blue” and used that to drybrush it.  I then painted her pants Aleene’s “Dusty Khaki”, and her jerkin with Americana “Territorial Beige”.

    Next, I painted her sleeves with Folk Art “Dapple Grey”, and her boots and arm guards with Folk Art “Butter Pecan”  Then I painted her face and hands with Crafters Acrylic “Flesh”, and her hair with Americana “Buttermilk”.  I worked on her scabbard next, painting it Americana “Jade Green”, with Duncan “Olive Green” trim. The arrow shafts I painted Folk Art “Porcelain White”, and the fletchings with Crafters Acrylic “Light Antique White (L.A.W.)”.  Next I did her bow, painting it Folk Art “Grey Green” with Aleenes “Deep Khaki” trim.

      After the paint had a while to dry, I gave the figure a wash with thinned Winsor Newton “Peat Brown” ink, being careful not to get any on the cape or base.  When the wash was dry, I did some highlighting on her under armor, first with the base “Slate Blue”, and then with Crafters Acrylic “Cool Blue”. I then worked on her cape and hood; first painting the cape with Folk Art “Celadon Green”, and then when that was dry, adding shadows with thinned Americana “Salem Blue”.

      I finished up with the cape by doing highlights on it with White.   I then worked on her face and hands, first doing her eyes, and then mixing a little Americana “Shading Flesh” with the “Flesh” to do her lips, and then adding a little White to do her lip highlights.  I then used the base “Flesh” to add highlights to her skin, and then added a little of the “L.A.W.” to do finer highlights. Next, I did her hair, first highlighting with the base  "Buttermlk, and then mixing in a little of the “L.A.W.” to do finer highlights.  I now worked on her clothing, highlighting her pants with the base  "Dusty Khaki", and her shirt with the base “Dapple Grey” with a little of the “Dusty Khaki” mixed in.  I then highlighted her jerkin with the “Butter Pecan”, and her boots and arm guards with the “Butter Pecan” mixed with a  little of the “L.A.W.”  Her scabbard I highlighted with the base “Jade Green” mixed with a little “L.A.W.”, and the trim I highlighted with the base “Olive Green” with a little of the “Jade Green” mixed in.  Her arrow shafts I highlighted with the base “Porcelain White”, and the fletchings with plain White.   I moved now to the bow, highlighting it with the base “Gray Green”, and the trim with the base “Deep Khaki”.  I finished up with some metallics; first with her earring, painting it first with Ceramcoat “Bronze”, and then doing highlights with Ceramcoat “14k Gold”.  I then added a little dab of thinned “Peat Brown” ink to the earring to help it pop. I then did the little circle trim around her hood, painting each dot with Folk Art “Metallic Blue Sapphire” first and then adding a tiny pinpoint highlight of Folk Art “Aqua Moire” Pearl paint to each dot.   Lastly, I painted her base White.  
     When everything had overnight to dry, I gave the figure a coat of Ceramcoat “Matte Varnish”.  The next morning I flocked the base with Woodland Scenics “Snow” flock.  Late that afternoon I sprayed the figure with Testor’s Dullcote.

      I’m really happy with how this figure turned out, and quite honestly it was a nice change of pace to paint a simple figure without  5 layers of clothing and a dozen things hanging off them, many of which you need to guess at what exactly they are.   I found with the simplicity I was able to take my time and really enjoy the process.
  For them that likes a close up, here you go:  

Bones Soup

    In other news, I spent part of the morning boiling some Bones terrain (the Dragons Don’t Share ruins and the Mashaaf base to be exact) in an old pot I picked up earlier this week at the local Goodwill.  After a 15-20 minute boil, I dropped the pieces into pot of ice water, and did my best to hold the bases flat on the bottom of the ice-water pot so the pieces would set up correctly.  So far I’m pleased with the results; not 100% flat but about 90%-95%, which I can live with.

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HAWKS Hold Fall-In City Fight Playtest Day

Chris Palmer       One of the special slates of games the HAWKs will be hosting at Fall-In is a series of  5 battles all taking place on the same city terrain set up.  Some of the members got together this past Saturday to run a couple of playtest games to test the city layout and a pair of the scenarios.
     The first was a WWII game using GAMER rules, run by Eric, that had Canadians trying to take a German held town in Holland in January ‘44.

An over-view of the table.

Canadian tanks and troops gain a foothold in the town.

A hidden German AT gun takes aim from a nearby woods.

   
    The second game had a more fanciful setting; this scenario involved forces of evil goblins trying to take control of Santa’s village while the big guy was away, using GASLIGHT rules, and run by Kurt.

A lone Teddy Bear cannon, assisted by the Bumble, tries to stop the onrushing Goblin hordes.

Evil Penguins take on a squad of Toy Soldiers defending the town square.

Heroic Elf workers from the toy factory defuse a bombing attempt on the bridge the hard way.

    Both games were enjoyable for the players, and the GMs got to see what tweaks they need to make to their scenarios.

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The Shrunken City of Summergrove: An Aquarium Terrain Conversion Project

Chris Palmer    A few years ago the local Petco pet store moved to a new location, and when the old store was closing they had a big clearance on everything. Preferring to sell the old store’s stock rather than move it.  Everything started at 25% off, and as the weeks went by the discount grew. When things got down to around 75% off, I went in to see what was left in the aquarium decoration department, and one of the things I got was this nifty little tiny castle on a pedestal.  For those that are interested, its item number is: PETCO 1095811. A quick look on Google reveled that it was actually part of a series of 4 with differing castles on top, and it looks like there are still some around for sale.

The original aquarium piece, shown with a 28mm figure.

I had stuck it in a cabinet not really having a specific use for it, or knowing what to do with it exactly.  Then when I recently got my Frostgrave rulebook one of the things I enjoyed reading in it were the little sidebar notes of supposed quotes from adventurers in the city; telling about some of the odd things they had seen on their excursions, such as a naked woman frozen in a block of ice, and a horde of rampaging stone hands.  The idea came to me that my little city might be a perfect such oddity to have in my version of Frostgrave. And so the idea for the fabled Shrunken city of Summergrove was born.  Perhaps a neighboring city at one time who had run afoul of a powerful wizard from Frostgrave; who got his revenge by shrinking the city and entrapping it in a glass dome.

A look at the Milliput addition to the back. And you can see some of the broken building tops.

The aquarium piece wold have been fine as it was, but I felt it stood too tall for use with 28mm figures. So, the first thing I had to do was separate the top from the bottom.  I managed this with a little effort with a hammer and chisel.  Unfortunately, in my enthusiasm I damaged some of the city buildings in doing this, so be careful if any of you try.   After I had separated the top from it’s pedestal, I drilled a hole in the underside to accept a standard clear flight-stand peg.  I then got a spare large round plastic base I had, and drilled a hole for the bottom of the flight-stand peg into it.  I then gave the base a top of paving stones cut from thin cardboard and glued in place.  After that, I sprayed the base flat black and then drybrushed the stones with various shades of grey.  When the base was dry, I glued the base, flight-stand, and castle together.
To make the dome, I dug out an old top from a bubblegum-machine prize that I had saved.  The rocky piece the castle sits on wasn’t quite big enough, or circular enough, for the dome to fit well, so I had to use some Milliput to build the back out a bit to fit the dome (see photo above). I also used the Milliput to fix some of the buildings I had broken while separating the top form the original pedestal.

The finished piece shown with a 28mm figure.

After I fixed the buildings I painted my repairs to match, and then gave the castle a wash with dark brown ink to bring out the detail.  I also painted he extended platform I had added to match the existing one. Lastly, I glued on the dome.

A close up of the castle detail.

I’m really pleased with how this turned out.  I think I will use it as a floating obstacle, moving randomly across the table.  It could also be used as an interesting objective in a scenario.

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Bones Return to Frostgrave: A Battle Report

Chris Palmer

  This past Sunday I got to try out the new Frostgrave rules again, this time with real opponents.  Two of my friends came over and we got to play a couple games. The first game we played was a three way battle between a Necromancer band controlled by me, an Illusionist party controlled by Buck, and a Chronomancer group controlled by Greg.  Greg and I had talked a while back how much the Chronomancer type of wizard reminded us of a Time Lord like Dr Who.  So, sure enough, for his faction Greg brought the Eleventh Doctor, and River Song, as his Wizard and Apprentice, which I thought was mighty cool.  He also brought three pieces of the rare material, Jethrik, as his treasure tokens.

Team Illusionist: The Wizard, Apprentice, Templar, Archer, Archer, Thief, Thief, Thief, Thug, Thug

Team Necromancer: Wizard, Apprentice, Man-at-Arms, Infantry, Archer, Treasure Hunter, Thief, Thug (Yes, he’s a goblin thug). The Necromancer was also able to raise a Zombie before the game began.

Team Chronomancer: Wizard (The Doctor), Apprentice (River Song), Infantry, Treasure Hunter, Crossbow, Crossbow, Crossbow, Thug

 We played a straight up game with no optional rules, and no campaign goals, as we all were still getting a feel for the rules.  While this was the first game for my two friends, I had played a solo match a week ago. As there was no chance of eliminating both enemy factions in a three-way match, claiming treasure became the primary goal of the game.

A view of the table near the beginning of the game. Buck entered his Illuisonist group from the far long side of the table, Greg from the near long side, and I entered from the short far side.

    As can be imagined, the action was chaotic.    The beginning level wizards were not having a good day as lots of spells failed. My Necromancer and his Apprentice tried numerous times to launch Bone Dart spells but they always seemed to miss, they soon were dubbed the “rubber chicken” bone darts. However, this made the spell successes all the more memorable.  The highlights being a well tossed grenade by the Illusionist; and the Illusionist’s apprentice managing to mind control the Chronomancer’s thug, with the sacrifice of some health to empower the spell. The Thug had just picked up a treasure, and was forced to carry it across the board; and as the game neared the end, the Illusionist Apprentice did a spectacular Push spell on him that shoved him over a foot and off the table edge with his treasure.

A swirling battle developed in the middle of the table between the Chonomancer’s forces and the Illusionist’s 

    As the game neared the end, my Necromancer had removed 4 treasures, the Illusionist 3, and the Chronomancer had 1.  There was one more treasure left, and my infantry woman was climbing down from the third floor of a ruined building with it. She had been wounded on top of the building by one of the Illusionist’s archers and now he finished her off with a spectacular shot through one of the buildings windows as she climbed down.  The Chronomancer teleported to the spot where the treasure now lay, as my Necromancer and his Apprentice moved up to claim it as well. My Apprentice finally managed a successful Bone Dart attack against the Chronomancer, putting him out of the game, just as the Illusionist successfully teleported to the spot as well.  I had a chance to Bone Dart him as well, as he picked up the treasure, but failed; and the next activation he teleported away.  The game ended in a tie of 4 treasures each for my Necromancer and Buck’s Illusionist, and one for  Greg’s Chronomancer. Everyone had a great time.

My Infantry lies dead next to the treasure as the Illusionist and the Chonomancer teleport in to claim it, as my Necromancer (visible in the lower left of the photo) moves up.  Out of view is my Apprentice who is on the other side of the rocky otcrop that the Necromancer is standing by, taking aim at the Chronomancer.

 At this point Buck had to leave, so Greg and I reset the terrain a bit and prepared to fight another game; this time with the plan to use the campaign rules and wandering monster rolls.   I took the Illusionist group this time, and Greg re-ran his Chronomancer gang.  Again, another good game was had.  The addition of the creatures was fun, especially when a ghoul appeared directly on the table edge behind my Illusionist. The creature badly injured my illusionist, before my wizard could teleport out of the engagement, and my archer then quickly finished off the Ghoul.

My Apprentice teleports to the top of the tower to retrieve a treasure (The treasure is a piece of jethrik.   To go along with the Dr Who figures, Greg used three pieces of this rare stuff as his treasure tokens. 🙂  )

    Another highlight included the same Chronomancer’s thug that got mind controlled in the first game getting mind controlled again with a treasure in his hands, this time by the Illusionist himself. Much humor ensued at the expense of this poor weak-minded thug.

As if from nowhere, a Ghoul appears and makes a dash for my wizard.  Luckily the nearby archer is able to dispatch the foul creature. 

 Best of all was a spectacular battle atop some tower ruin, as my Apprentice teleported up there to grab a treasure, followed by the Chronomancer infantry soldier who began to climb the tower after her.  The Chronomancer himself then teleported up to the tower’s top on the Wizard phase of the next turn. Desperate, the Apprentice tried a Push spell on the Chonomancer and succeeded spectacularly pushing him 9 inches back and off the tower.  The 6 inch drop then did 9 points of damage to the Chronomancer as he fell. The next turn my Apprentice picked up the treasure, and as the infantryman neared her, she teleported off the tower the following turn.

Duel atop the tower. The Doctor and my Apprentice face off

      The game ended soon after that, with the movement of the last of my soldiers off the table after retrieving 4 of the treasures.  Both wizards were badly battered but not dead.  While I had managed to get four of the treasure again, Greg got two this time.   We then spent a few minutes to run through the after-game book keeping.  I had lost two thugs and a thief during the game, and while one of the thugs and the thief were quick to recuperate my other thug was injured badly enough to have to miss the next encounter. Treasure wise, I got a nice pile of gold coins and a pair of grimoires.  I earned 240 experience points, going up two levels.  I used these to increase my health by one, and my skill at teleporting by one.

The result of the duel: The Doctor lay badly hurt where he fell into a ruin, after being pushed 9" off the tower.

     Both games were a lot of fun, and there are a lot of nuances to the game which will be fun to learn and experiment with.  My Illusionist, now named Nikon, and his trusty apprentice, named Cherowyn, are now settled in an old abandoned inn on the edge of the city; fixing it up and preparing for their next excursion. They have put out a call for a Ranger to join their ranks, since they have so much extra space at the inn; and can afford his fes now with the treasure they recovered; he should be here in time to join the next adventure.  It will be just in time too, as the poor injured thug will not make the next outing.

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