Little Groups of Paratroops – A Battleground WWII Scenario

Don Hogge
“March to the sound of the guns and kill anyone who is not dressed like you…"  On D-Day, small groups of scattered paratroopers merged into larger groups. One such group from the 101st Airborne Division found itself near a causeway exit from Utah Beach.  The beach exits were primary objectives and had to be taken and held until the beach landing forces could link up.

 
Looking from the far side of the village toward the beach

Another view of the village

View from the south side of the village

The Germans had flooded some areas in an attempt to hinder an Allied invasion.  They had a bunker with an anti-tank gun positioned to cover the beach exit.

Looking from the beach towards the causeway exit at the village; protected by a pillbox

The German defenders started in the village and had to send out two patrols on preset routes (until contact was made).

A different view from the beach side

The four groups of paratroopers were scattered around the table after randomly determining their starting points.

The German defenders paid a heavy price to keep one group Airborne troops out of the village

Another little group of Airborne troops approaches through the woods

The paratroopers moved building to building to clear a route to the bunker blocking the beach exit.

"Knock, Knock”

By game’s end, they had cleared most of the village and had effectively neutralized the bunker.  The Germans only controlled two buildings and had a bunker full of wounded and broken men.

An Airborne trooper throws a grenade into the bunker

In the end, the Airborne had captured a majority of the village and the pillbox had been neutralized.  A minor victory to the Americans.

(Note:  I forgot this entry was in my draft folder – oops)

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