Nienna, Female Elf Ranger; Figure 164 of 165

Chris Palmer

   This week I painted Nienna, Female Elf Ranger, from the Heroes Set.  The next “Bones I” figure I do (Figure 165 of 265) will put me at the 100-remaining-figures mark, which is a great milestone to reach.  I really would like to get Bones I completed before Bones III ships, which will give me just over a year to do those last 100 figures.
        I prepped the figure in the usual way; soaking it in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish- soap added, then giving it a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying.   I then glued the figure to a 1" black-primed fender washer with Aleene’s Tacky glue, and glued the washer to a tongue depressor with a couple drops of Elmer’s White Glue.
         Though this is a great dynamic sculpt, it has a lot of hard to see detail, and a bit of loss of detail on the sides of the bent leg.

    I began painting by giving her a wash with thinned black ink with a tiny pin-point drop of dishsoap added to help it flow into the crevices and help show the sculpting outlines. I think I used too much ink, or not enough dishsoap, as I got a bit of a mottled mess, that didn’t help with the details.

  I then drybrushed the figure a bit with White to help maybe clarify the details in the muddy ink wash.  Finally I just needed to grit my teeth and jump in to painting the figure.  I began by painting her pants with DecoArt “Light Antique White”.  Next, I painted her boots with Americana “Mississippi Mud”.  I then did her tunic and the dead tree trunk with Americana “Charcoal Grey”.

   I then painted her cloak with Folk Art “Grey Green”, and the loin hanging with Folk Art Porcelain White".  The leaf-looking hanging I painted Apple Barrel “Burnt Sienna”, and the mossy growth on the side of the tree trunk I painted Accent “Golden Oxide”.

     Next, I painted her face and hands with DecoArt “Flesh”. I then painted her dagger sheath and quiver with Folk Art “Dapple Grey”.  The bow I painted Folk Art “Butter Pecan”, and the arrow shafts I did with Americana “Khaki Tan”.  The fletchings I painted White, and the sword grip I painted Americana “Asphaltum.” Her knee guards, shoulder guard, and belt I painted Americana “Sable Brown”. The tie around her quiver I painted Aleene’s “Deep Khaki”

    When the paint had had a chance to thoroughly dry, I gave the entire figure a wash with GW “Agrax Earthshade” using a wet brush.

   After the wash was dry, I painted her hair Black, and then added some Folk Art “Settlers Blue” highlights.   I then painted her lips with Americana “Shading Flesh”, and then highlighted her face and hands with the base “Flesh”.   Next,  I worked on highlighting the rest of the figure.  I used the base “Grey Green” to highlight the cloak, then added finer highlights to the cloak with the “Porcelain White”.  While I had the “Porcelain White” out, I did the highlights on her loin hanging.  I highlighted her boots with the base “Mississippi Mud”, and then mixed some of the “Mississippi Mud” with the “Charcoal Grey” to highlight her tunic and the tree trunk.  The rest of he smaller parts of her outfit and accouterments I highlighted with the base colors I had used.

      I then worked on the metal parts; painting the sword, buckles and pin, bow fittings and dagger parts, all with Ceramcoat “Metallic Pewter”.  I then did highlights with Folk Art “Silver Sterling”.
       Lastly, I painted her base White, and added some white spots to the tree trunk.  When everything had overnight to dry, I gave the figure a coat of Ceramcoat “Matte Varnish”.  The next morning I flocked the base with Woodland Scenics “Snow” flock.  Late that afternoon I sprayed the figure with Testor’s Dullcote.

     I’m generally pleased with the results with this figure.  I wanted to do  a winter figure without using blue (which seems to be my default), and I think the colors I chose works well on this.

Figure 164 of 165: Complete

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